Poster Contest Winner Pays It Forward

When third-grader Audrey Mathews won first prize for her age group in the Prevention 1st 2018/19 Fire Safety Poster Contest, she knew exactly what she wanted to do with her $50 prize money: she donated it to support her school district’s therapy dog.

Audrey’s parents say she has a love of service and therapy animals because they help keep people calm in emergencies. Audrey’s winning poster delivers a crucial message about responding when the smoke alarm goes off:  “Don’t scream, don’t shout, keep calm and get out.”

As part of Audrey’s prize, her classroom at Scribner Road Elementary School also received a $200 gift certificate for art supplies.

Click here to see all the winning posters.

Other good things coming from the Fire Safety Poster Contest: a ride to school on a fire truck for poster artist Fiston Heca and his sister.

New Smoke Alarms Help, But They’re Not a Cure-All

You still have to provide other pieces of the safety puzzle.

test your smoke alarm
Even smoke alarms with long-life batteries need testing.

Fire departments and injury prevention organizations like Prevention 1st are celebrating the upcoming implementation of New York State’s new smoke alarm requirements.  As of April 1, all smoke alarms sold in New York must have a 10-year, sealed, non-removable battery, which will undoubtedly prevent a significant number of fire deaths and serious injuries.

While most fires happen during the day, most fatal fires occur at night.  Having even one working smoke alarm in your home reduces the chance of dying in a fire by more than half.  It is difficult to find a more effective, accessible and affordable prevention tool, which is why most states require them in the first place.  Yet people still die in fires on a regular basis.  Why? 

Missing or dead batteries!  Well-meaning people, annoyed by the sound of a dying battery, or by one that is doing its job around a smoky kitchen or steamy bathroom, take out the battery.  So do people who are in immediate “need” of a battery for a remote control or other device.  Regardless of reason, most people have every intention of replacing that battery, but just don’t get around to it, with sometimes tragic consequences.

Ten-year smoke alarms, with long-life batteries that are sealed into the unit, will make a big difference in improving safety.  But there are a few things New Yorkers need to know before they install their new ones and forget about them for a decade.

Test your smoke alarm regularly.  Long-life batteries are just that – but “long life” may not be ten years.  Batteries can and do fail, so continue to test them once a month.

Keep it free of dirt and dust.  Alarms are sensitive and finely tuned; like any appliance, they work better when clean!  Use a vacuum hose or duster to remove damaging dirt.

Be ready to replace it before ten years is up.  A 2008 CDC-commissioned study found that after ten years, 78% of smoke alarms with lithium batteries were that were installed through a public outreach program were still operational.  That leaves 22% that were not.  Keep testing!

Don’t forget the other pieces of the safety puzzle.  The time to figure out who is helping children or elderly relatives escape from fire is not the middle of the night with alarms going off and smoke filling your home.  Develop an exit plan with your family and practice it at least twice a year!

The new smoke alarms, while slightly more expensive, will be well worth the cost in lives saved and injuries prevented.  But they are not a cure-all, and taking a few additional steps will help make your home and your family that much safer.

This article also appeared as an op-ed piece by Prevention 1st president Molly Clifford in the March 23,2019 issue of the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle.

Prevention 1st Fire Safety Poster Contest Winners Announced!

Congratulations to our 1st Place Winners in each category:
Rishaan Shah, Kindergarten, Scribner Road Elementary School
Audrey Mathews, 3rd grade, Scribner Road Elementary School
Julia Thomas, 5th grade, St. Joseph School

Honorable mentions go to:
Hyoju Noh, Kindergarten, Cobbles Elementary School
Adaya Sykes, 3rd grade, Sykes Family Homeschool
Addison Zimmerman, 4th grade, Abelard Reynolds School #42

See all the winning posters here.

And congratulations to fifth-grader Fiston Heca, the lucky winner of a random drawing of all poster artists, who will get a ride on a firetruck to Abelard Reynolds School #42, courtesy of the Rochester Fire Department!

Prevention 1st would like to thank this year’s judges for their work in choosing this year’s winners from more than 200 entries from across the County: New York State Senator Joe Robach, Monroe County Fire Coordinator Steve Schalabba, Rochester Fire Marshal Christine Schryver, and the Memorial Art Gallery Education Director Marlene Hamman-Whitmore.

Posters were judged on both artistic merit and the impact of its fire safety message. All participants will receive a certificate and all posters will be displays at the following locations around the city and county during March:

Rochester Public Library Children’s Center (winners and honorable mentions)
Monroe County Office Building
Rochester City Hall
Greater Rochester International Airport
Rochester Museum and Science Center
Eastview Mall The Mall at Greece Ridge
Canandaigua National Bank
Eastside Family YMCA

Board Member Honored for Service to Students With Disabilities

Brett Rogoff

Prevention 1st Board Member Brett Rogoff will be honored at The Cooke School and Institute’s Food for Thought Gala in Manhattan next month. Cooke is recognizing Brett and his team at Strategic Group for their support and partnership in furthering the mission of the school, which provides special education services for students ages 5 through 21 who have mild-to-moderate cognitive or developmental disabilities and severe language-based learning disabilities. The Strategic Group team has hosted Cooke interns, providing these high school and young adult students with real-world work experiences that help them make the transition from the classroom, and find and pursue their passions.

Through Brett’s efforts, Prevention 1st in partnership with Community Health Strategies brought the BIC play safe be safe! fire safety program to The Cooke School. Originally designed for young children, the award-winning interactive program worked perfectly for this new audience of 14- to 18-year-olds who need to develop life skills.

Protect Your Home From Electrical Fires

The cold weather and darkness this month have us turning on lights, heating and appliances. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, that may be why January is the leading month for electrical fires. Today’s electrical demands can overburden the electrical system in a home, especially homes more than 40 years old that have older wiring, electrical systems, and devices.

Protect yourself and your family by making sure all electrical work in your home is done by a qualified electrician and following these tips from USFA:

  • Always plug major appliances–such as refrigerators, stoves, washers and dryers–directly into a wall outlet. Never use an extension cord with a major appliance.
  • Unplug small appliances when you’re not using them.
  • Keep lamps, light fixtures and light bulbs away from anything that can burn.
  • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or fixture.
  • Check electrical cords on appliances often. Replace cracked, damaged and loose electrical cords.
  • Don’t overload wall outlets.
  • Never force a three-prong cord into a two-slot outlet.
  • Install tamper-resistant electrical outlets if you have young children.
  • Use power strips that have internal overload protection.

Find more home fire prevention tips and information at USFA’s electrical fire safety outreach materials webpage: https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/electrical.html.

 

Golf Tournament Raises $38,000+

The 2018 Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st raised more than $38,000 to support key injury prevention programs.

This year’s silent auction raised $455 for a new fund memorializing Stephen Rogoff, who along with Harvey Bunis conceived of, developed and co-chaired the Golf Tournament since its beginning in 2013. The inaugural Golf Tournament held in 2013 was Prevention 1st’s first major fund raiser.

Our thanks and congratulations to Jessica Holly and Michael Chatwin, who will co-chair next year’s event. Congratulations to our winning foursomes and outstanding golfers:

1st Place Men’s (60):  Rick Glazer, Jeff Rubens, Jordan Morgenstern, Adrian Morgenstern

1st Place Mixed (76):  Kevin Lillis, Shelly VanLare, Joan Updaw, Wendy Guinn

Closest to the Pin # 4 (Men):              Matt Diberaradinis (3’ 4”)

Closest to the Pin # 4  (Women):       Marie Michaels (40’ 00”)

Closest to the Line #7 (Men):             Chris Wensley

Closest to the Line #7 (Women):        Shelly VanLare

Thanks to all of our golfers and attendees, to Midvale Country Club for their outstanding service and support, to Abrams Fensterman for donation of tote bags and Buckingham Properties for donation of roadway multi-tool gifts for all golfers and attendees, Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak for donation of on-course snacks and beverages, Ralph Honda for sponsorship of the Hole in One Contest, Sage Rutty for golf cart sponsorship, and to our 2018 Golf Committee: Harvey Bunis, Jessica Holly, John Eilertsen, Michael Chatwin, Rick Glazer, Kristin Fulford, Sarabeth Rogoff, Scott Rogoff, and Joan Updaw.

Tournament Sponsors

Abrams Fensterman, LLPB

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Sage Rutty

Ralph Honda

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC

 

Flag Sponsors

Cooley Group, Inc.

Cathy & Jack Dinaburg

Ernstrom & Dreste, LLP

Woods Oviatt Gilman, LLP

Community Health Strategies

 

Tee Sponsors

Abrams Fensterman, LLP

Barclay Damon, LLP

Bell Cornerstone

Browncroft Family Restaurant

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Harvey S. Bunis, Esq.

Canandaigua National Bank

Friends of Molly Clifford

Robert Cole & Daryl Sharp

Community Health Strategies

Developmental Disabilities Giving Circle

DJP Development LLC

CurAegis Technologies

Eagle Cleaners

EkoStinger

First American Title Insurance Company

Flaherty Salmin CPAs

The Glazer Family

Golf Weekly

Heritage Financial Services, LLC

Kevin & 3 Ladies

Kiwanis West Central

Al Mason, Photographer

Mengel Metzger Barr & Co, LLP

Thomas H. Neilans, Ph.D.

Palmer Food Services

Debbie & David Pelusio

Perlo’s Restaurant

Pickle Factory

PointClickCare

Ralph Honda

Senator Joe Robach

Rochester Area Community Foundation

Rochester Hardwood Floor

Heather & Brett Rogoff

Ruda Investment Group

Sage Rutty and Co.

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC

Sign Design

Sharon P. Stiller

Trillium Health

Upstate Special Needs Planning

Webster Schubel Meier Elder Law

Still Time to Register for Sept. 17 Golf Tournament

The 2018 Jane & Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st will be held on Monday, Sept. 17 at Midvale Country Club. There are still a few spots available for foursomes. Sponsorships are also available, and non-golfers are welcome for dinner and silent auction following the tournament.

Download the flyer and registration form here.

Golfers will have a “hole in one” opportunity to win a car donated by Ralph Honda. All participants including golfers and dinner guests will receive a tote bag donated by Abrams Fensterman. Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak is donating on-course snacks and beverages. Silent auction items include a Rochester Amerks package, shoe donated by a Buffalo Bills wide receiver, hotel packages, riding lessons, golfing at many major golf courses in the area,  and more.

This year’s event will also honor the memory of Stephen Rogoff, founding co-chair of the Prevention 1st Golf Tournament, who passed away on August 14.

Prevention 1st Teams Up With Girl Scouts

Prevention 1st is creating a Leadership Development program for the Girl Scouts of Western New York (GSWNY) focusing on fire safety and prevention. Senior Girl Scouts will develop and practice their fire safety presentations, then train Daisy and/or Brownie troops. The trainings will count toward the Senior Girl Scouts’ leadership awards, and toward the younger Girl Scouts’ BIC play safe! be safe!® Fire Safety Education Patch.

“GSWNY believes the Leaders in Prevention program will help retain Senior Girl Scouts, build relationships between the younger and older girls, and motivate the junior Girl Scouts to stay with scouting beyond the elementary grades,” said Scarlett Webb, Girl Experience Specialist at GSWNY.

Prevention 1st will host two leadership development training sessions, one in Monroe County sponsored by the John F. Wegman Fund of the Rochester Area Community Foundation, and one in Erie County sponsored by Prevention 1st. At these the Senior Girl Scouts will learn about: the fire risk in young children, approaches to teaching young children, presentation skills to keep their audience engaged and learning, and resources to assist in teaching. They will develop a presentation and practice it in front of the group, then work with GSWNY to schedule presentations for Daisy and/or Brownie troops to ultimately train 900 junior Girl Scouts.

 

Fireworks for Sale? Let’s Pass Them By

In Prevention 1st’s home state of New York, some counties will allow the sale of certain types of fireworks during the month of June and through the holiday weekend. A new state law allows “sparkling devices”—sparklers and other small ground fireworks­—to be sold and used in counties that approved a local version of the law.

Our take on this? Even when and where they’re legal, we still have plenty of reasons to leave fireworks to the pros. That includes sparklers, which burn hot enough to cause third degree burns and account for a quarter of emergency room fireworks injuries, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

By the way, it’s still illegal to set off fireworks in counties that didn’t approve the new law even if you bought them in a county that allows fireworks. And no one under the age of 18 is allowed to handle even legal fireworks—including sparklers and other sparking devices—in the state of New York.