Clocks Change March 13: And Yes, You Should Still Test Your Alarms

Even for smoke alarms that have long-life batteries—or are hard-wired—it’s still important to make sure the alarm is working. Not every single long-life battery will work for 10 years, and even hard-wired alarms can fail. So yes, you should still test your smoke alarms at least twice a year — the Daylight Saving Time change is a good reminder—and once a month is better, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association.

Our “Test Your Alarms” message includes your CO detector. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends pushing the test button on your CO detector (which tests whether the circuitry is operating correctly), to replace the detector at the age recommended by the manufacturer, and most importantly to go outside to fresh air immediately if it goes off.

That goes for smoke alarms too: When the alarms go off, you get out. Searching for the source of the CO or the fire could be a fatal mistake.

Why practice a home fire drill? Because even the best alarm can only protect your family if everyone knows what to do when it goes off. And if that happens at night when people are sleeping—the time when most fatal fires occur—it can be harder than you think to get up and out quickly.

Make sure hallways are kept clear of clutter and that everyone knows at least two ways of getting out—one of them may be a window—especially from bedrooms. Make sure everyone understands how important it is to go to your outside meeting place so if there is a fire you’ll know whether everyone is out. When the fire service arrives, tell them if everyone is at the meeting place and about any pets that may still be inside.

Prevention 1st Conducts Kids’ Poster Contest at Lifespan

Prevention 1st has a long tradition of bringing creativity together with fire safety education. In the fall of 2021, the school districts in Monroe County received complimentary “Fire Drill Reminder” posters and an invitation for students in grades K-5 to enter the Prevention 1st 14th Annual Fire Safety Poster Contest. This year saw 109 local students, representing seven schools and three districts, heed the call by the January 22, 2022 deadline. Last year’s entries numbered 87.

The training room at Lifespan is temporarily turned into a judging room.

“A pandemic of over two years has not dimmed enthusiasm for the poster contest,” said Charly Sommers, the program’s administrator. “The kids share their own unique messages, urging others to take steps to prevent fires as well as how to respond in the event of a fire emergency. Having the contest at Lifespan brings a lot of joy—people are starting to look forward to it now.”

This year’s winners were chosen by the staff of Lifespan, who recently took over Prevention 1st as an in-house program. “Lifespan has served the Rochester community for over 50 years, and we are very pleased to take on the work of Prevention 1st,” said Jody Rowe, Chief Operating Officer at Lifespan. “Providing safety and injury prevention education fits well with our mission to help older adults and caregivers take on both the challenges and opportunities of longer life. Interacting with school-age children through the poster contest is uplifting and offers an intergenerational opportunity.”

Qualifying posters were arranged across surfaces in a meeting room, grouped according to grade level. Each employee was given one vote, or “ticket” to be dropped onto their favorite poster in each grade level. Tickets were counted and removed frequently to prevent the influence of popularity. Those who couldn’t vote in person were invited to vote online.

The votes have now all been tallied and Lifespan is pleased to present the results of this year’s Prevention 1st Annual Poster Contest:

Dylan T. (Listwood, West Irondequoit)

Kindergarten: Dylan T. (Listwood, West Irondequoit), submitted by Ms. Nassimos

Honorable mentions: Rhea M., Eloise T., Brooklyn C. (Seneca, West Irondequoit), also submitted by Ms. Nassimos

Remas A. (RISE Community, RCSD #106)

1st Grade: Remas A. (RISE Community, RCSD #106), submitted by Ms. Riemer

Honorable mentions: Thaddaeus D., Elliany B. (RISE Community, RCSD #106), also submitted by Ms. Riemer

Ellie K. (Colebrook, West Irondequoit)

2nd Grade: Ellie K. (Colebrook, West Irondequoit), submitted by Mrs. Ellis

Honorable mentions:  Yohana E., Jayden C., Arianna B. (RISE Community, RCSD #106), submitted by Ms. Riemer

Jimmy N. (Southlawn, West Irondequoit)

3rd Grade: Jimmy N. (Southlawn, West Irondequoit), submitted by Mrs. Stewart

Honorable mentions: Noah N. (Colebrook, West Irondequoit), submitted by Ms. Edell; Emma M. (Southlawn, West Irondequoit), submitted by Mrs. Stewart

MiKenzie B. (Chestnut Ridge, Churchville-Chili)

4th Grade: MiKenzie B. (Chestnut Ridge, Churchville-Chili), submitted by Mrs. Chalifoux

Honorable mentions: Grace M. (Rogers, West Irondequoit), submitted by Ms. LaPierre; Amaris M. (Chestnut Ridge, Churchville-Chili), submitted by Mrs. Chalifoux

Angelise Torres (Abelard Reynolds, RCSD #42)

5th Grade: Angelise Torres (Abelard Reynolds, RCSD #42), submitted by Ms. Graham

Honorable mentions: Isla B., Jaylani M., Adaniel M.G. (Abelard Reynolds, RCSD #42), submitted by Ms. Graham

Qualifying posters met the size guidelines (11” x 17”) and did not contain any personal information on the front of the poster. First prize winners in each category will receive a $50 gift card, and their schools will each receive a check for $200 from Prevention 1st at Lifespan. First prize winners and Honorable Mentions also receive merit ribbons, and all entrants receive a certificate of appreciation for their work.

The coveted Grand Prize, a ride to school on a fire truck, was determined by raffle, open to all students who entered the contest. This year’s Grand Prize winner is: Eric B., a fifth grade student from Abelard Reynolds School #42 (RCSD). Prevention 1st will coordinate the ride to school for Eric when the weather is more agreeable.

Contest posters will be on display at various locations around town beginning April 2022, including the Monroe County Government Office building, Rochester City Hall, and the Frederick Douglass Airport. “We’re also considering putting up some of these posters at our Lifespan service centers,” Sommers said, “as a way of one generation looking after and connecting with another.”

Lifespan conducts this and other programs with the help of volunteers. To find out more about Volunteering with Prevention 1st at Lifespan, please contact us at: https://prevention1st.org/home/contact/.

Prevention 1st Now a Program of Lifespan

Beginning in January 2022 Prevention 1st will be a program of Lifespan of Greater Rochester, which shares our mission of helping older adults and others be safe at home. Prevention 1st delivered its first class with Lifespan in November 2021, and we look forward to presenting more safety workshops in 2022. We’ll be starting with Lifespan sites in the Rochester, NY community where other classes and workshops are given: The Lily Café at the Maplewood YMCA on January 10, and St. Bernard’s Park Apartments on February 7.

You can still sign up as a volunteer by visiting the Prevention 1st website. Note that after January 1, our donation page will route to Lifespan’s online donation page. Be sure to indicate your gift is to support Prevention 1st, using the “Purpose of Donation” field. Checks mailed to Prevention 1st in care of Lifespan will continue to be routed to program staff.

Lifespan Presents First Prevention 1st Home Safety Class

Prevention 1st has formed a partnership with Lifespan of Greater Rochester, which shares our mission of helping older adults and others be safe at home. Beginning in January, Prevention 1st will become a program of Lifespan.

Prevention 1st delivered its first class with Lifespan on November 15 as part of Lifespan’s free “Information and Inspiration” series. Thanks to Nancy Lane, who did a great job in Prevention 1st’s very first 1-hour in-person/zoom hybrid class.

The class was very well received and the group asked some great questions. We also received kudos from the training manager who sat in on the class. We look forward to presenting more safety workshops in 2022.

Home Safety Workshop Offered Nov. 15

Prevention 1st will offer “Home Safety Strategies” on November 15 as part of Lifespan’s free “Information and Inspiration” series. Learn how to make your home safe by identifying common hazards that make you vulnerable to fires, falls, and preventable accidents..

The session will be in-person (masks required) at Lifespan, 1900 S. Clinton Ave, Rochester, NY.

Reservations are required. Visit Lifespan’s Information & Inspiration webpage for more information and to register: https://www.lifespan-roch.org/information-inspiration

Sure, Sleep In on Nov. 7 – Just Check Your Smoke Alarms Too

Most people use the gift of an extra hour given by the fall Daylight Saving Time change to catch a few extra Zzzs. Go for it—and when you get up, use another minute to test your alarms.

Ideally you should test all smoke alarms monthly, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association. For sure, let the biannual time change be a great reminder. Even for smoke alarms that have long-life batteries—or are hard-wired—it’s still important to make sure the alarm is working. Not every single long-life battery will work for 10 years, and even hard-wired alarms can fail. Test your CO detectors too. They need to be replaced every 5-7 years.

While having a working smoke alarm is important, it’s just as important that everyone knows what to do if it goes off. Make sure everyone in your home knows to get moving right away, because you probably have less time than you think to escape.

When you plan your escape route, include where outside you will all meet. Your meeting place should be a safe distance from your home but where firefighters can see you. Choose something very specific that everyone can remember and find easily: a tree, a telephone pole, or mailbox.

Do you need to update your escape plan? Look around and think about what’s changed in the last 6 months or year. Has an older adult joined your household? Consider whether they should sleep in a room on the ground floor to make escape easier. If anyone in your household has diminished hearing, consider a type of smoke alarm that uses a low frequency, flashing light or vibration.

This year many people are welcoming a return to holiday gatherings. Will guests be staying over? Tell visitors to your home about your family’s fire escape plan, including your meeting place. Show overnight guests how to open deadbolts or security bars. When you or your children are staying overnight at other people’s homes, ask about their escape plan.

Thanks for Supporting the Prevention 1st Golf Tournament

Thanks to all who came out to join us on a great day at Irondequoit Country Club for the final Jane & Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st. A special thank-you to our Golf Sponsors.

Congratulations to our winning golfers:

1st Place Men’s Division (Score 57):
Zach Buschner, Eric Koehler, Max Koehler, Ryan Wegman

1st Place Mixed Division (Score 65):
Cook Properties, Maxwell Dowd, Lindsay Joyce, George Lynch

Longest Drive #10 Men: Joe Lachiusa
Longest Drive #10 Women: Shelly VanLare
Closest to Pin #6 Men: Max Koehler
Closest to Pin #6 Women: Maureen Bass

Skins:
Team Appelbaum 3 on Hole #17
Team Koehler 3 on Hole #7

Sept. 12 is National Grandparents Day: Help Keep Them Safe

Get family involved! Enlisting their grandchildren can be a great way to help older adults receive important reminders about avoiding injuries. Kids can help check for household hazards and look to see that there are smoke alarms. Older kids and teens can help test alarms and help you with other safety checks and tasks. A few things to remember:

  • Check the home for tripping hazards. If there are small rugs, they can be taped down to avoid slipping.
  • Are all the exits clear of furniture and clutter? Would it be easy to get out of the home if the smoke alarm or CO detector goes off?
  • Are night lights needed  in bedrooms, bathrooms and hallways? Make sure there is enough light at the top of stairs.
  • Are stair handrails firm?
  • Does the bathroom need grab bars, a non-slip mat, a shower seat?
  • Are there smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors on each level and outside the bedroom? Remember that smoke alarms should be replaced every ten years and CO alarms every seven years.
  • Test the smoke alarms (including hard-wired ones). Are they working, and just as importantly, can everyone in the home hear the alarms? Basic smoke alarms may be difficult to hear because of their high pitched sound. If your ‘grand’ can’t hear the alarm from the next room, consider a Strobe Alarm which uses an extra bright light, or a Shaker Alarm that uses a vibrating device to shake a bed to awaken someone who wouldn’t hear the alarm without hearing aids.
  • Try this tip from our 2020 Rogoff Scholarship winner: Add a reminder to family members’ calendars to regularly change each alarm’s battery.
  • When was the last time the furnace and chimney were checked or cleaned? You may need to call to schedule a service or cleaning.

Help Make Our Final Golf Tournament the Most Successful Ever

2021 Golf tournament

This year’s Jane & Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament on September 20 is the organization’s last. Prevention 1st is now working with Lifespan to carry out its work in the community.

At this year’s Tournament dinner we will honor several individuals and organizations who have been tremendous supporters of Prevention 1st:

Wayne and Judy Holly, supporters for many years

Buckingham Properties, long-time sponsors of the Golf Tournament

Lifespan, with which Prevention 1t is now working to fuilfill its mission

This year’s Prevention 1st Tournament donations will be made in honor of Stephen Rogoff and Harvey Bunis, who started this tournament to help their dear friend fulfill his dream.

Whether it’s for golf or dinner only, we hope you’ll join us for this very special day. For details and to register click here.

Thank you to our Golf Tournament Sponsors!

Thank You to Our 2021 Golf Tournament Sponsors!

We at Prevention 1st appreciate the tremendous support of our sponsors in making the Jane & Larry

Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament a success!

Tournament Sponsors

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Cook Properties

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Flag Sponsors

Alladin’s of Schoen Place

Cathy & Jack Dinaburg

Abrams Fensterman       

Greater Rochester Health Foundation (GRHF)

LOGS Legal Group

Ralph Honda

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Tee Sponsors

Appelbaum Family

Bell Cornerstone

Browncroft Family Restaurant

CCM Flooring

Cook Properties

Developmental Disabilities Giving Circle

Flaherty Salmin CPAs

Heritage Financial

Kevin Lillis & Friends

Rochester Area Community Foundation (RACF)

Rochester Fire Department

Daryl Sharp & Bob Cole 

WSM Elder Law, P.C. 

Walworth Animal Hospital

Register here for the September 20, 2021 Golf Tournament.