2021 Winning Fire Safety Posters Unveiled!

This year’s Prevention 1st Poster Contest received 86 entries submitted by 16 teachers representing 9 local school districts in the Rochester, New York area. Posters are being displayed at the Frederick Douglass Greater Rochester International Airport and will be going up at other public venues around town.

See the winning posters for each grade level:

Kindergarten:

Kindergarten 1st Prize Winner

First Prize: Daphne A. (West Irondequoit)

Honorable Mentions: Jacob T. (West Irondequoit), Hazel T., Natalie M., and Mallory A. (West Irondequoit)

First Grade:

1st Grade First Prize Winner

First Prize: Moses B. (East Rochester)

Honorable Mention: Emma L. (Gates-Chili)

Second/Third Grade:

2nd/3rd Grade First Prize: Alyssa B. (Churchville-Chili)

Honorable Mentions: Fiona G. (East Rochester), Ezekiel S. (Churchville-Chili)

Fourth Grade:

4th Grade First Prize Winner

4th Grade First Prize: Giuliana C. (Rochester RC Diocese Schools)

Honorable Mention: Alissandra R. (Rochester RC Diocese Schools)

Fifth Grade:

5th Grade First Prize Winner

5th Grade First Prize: Anna B. (Churchville Chili)

Honorable Mentions: Wyatt S. (St. Rochester RC Diocese Schools), Abby F. (Honeoye Falls)

Winners of the Teacher Drawing for $500 Staples Gift Cards:

Ms. Tabor, Rochester RC Diocese Schools

Ms. Nassimos, West Irondequoit

Ms. Martin, East Rochester

Ms. Foehner, Churchville-Chili

Mrs. Selvaggio, Churchville-Chili

Ms. Coccia, East Rochester

Miss Hanss, St. Kateri

Mrs. Barton, Churchville-Chili

Ms. Kagel, Churchville-Chili

Ms. Gonzalez, (home school)

Clocks Change March 14: And Yes, You Should Still Test Your Alarms

Change your clocks, test your alarms, practice your home fire drill

Even for smoke alarms that have long-life batteries—or are hard-wired—it’s still important to make sure the alarm is working. Not every single long-life battery will work for 10 years, and even hard-wired alarms can fail. So yes, you should still test your smoke alarms at least twice a year — the Daylight Saving Time change is a good reminder—and once a month is better, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association.

Our “Test Your Alarms” message includes your CO detector. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends pushing the test button on your CO detector (which tests whether the circuitry is operating correctly), to replace the detector at the age recommended by the manufacturer, and most importantly to go outside to fresh air immediately if it goes off.

That goes for smoke alarms too: When the alarms go off, you get out. Searching for the source of the CO or the fire could be a fatal mistake.

Why practice a home fire drill? Because even the best alarm can only protect your family if everyone knows what to do when it goes off. And if that happens at night when people are sleeping—the time when most fatal fires occur—it can be harder than you think to get up and out quickly.

Make sure hallways are kept clear of clutter and that everyone knows at least two ways of getting out—one of them may be a window—especially from bedrooms. Make sure everyone understands how important it is to go to your outside meeting place, so if there is a fire you’ll know whether everyone is out. When the fire service arrives, tell them if everyone is at the meeting place and about any pets that may still be inside.

You can learn more about installing and testing smoke alarms, and planning and practice your escape, at homefiredrill.org.

Space Heater Safety

We’re spending more time at home, and that means we’re spending more time with space heaters. For homes in regions with milder winters with no central heating, space heaters may be the main source for heating. In colder climates they may be used to supplement central heating, and to keep down heating fuel costs.

Stay safe this winter with these tips:

  • Keep the heater at least 3 feet away from anything that can burn—paper, bedding, clothing, curtains or furniture  Having combustibles too close to the heat source is the leading factor contributing to home heating fires.
  • Turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Keep children away from space heaters, especially when they’re wearing night gowns or other loose clothing that can easily catch fire.
  • With electrical heaters, make sure the circuit isn’t overloaded. Plug space heaters directly into a wall outlet, and don’t plug any other electrical devices into the same outlet as the heater. Don’t use an extension cord or power strip; these could overheat and start a fire.
  • Place space heaters on level, flat surfaces.
  • Never place heaters on cabinets, tables, furniture, or carpet, which can overheat and start a fire.
  • Keep electrical heaters well away from water.
  • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.

Learn about safely using kerosene heaters here.

Send Us Your Fire Safety Posters by Jan. 22

A reminder for all student artists: the deadline for the Prevention 1st Fire Safety Poster Contest is next Friday, January 22.

Students in grades K-12 are eligible. Prizes include $50 for winners and $200 to their schools for supplies. Find all prizes and rules here.

Be sure to send you submission to our new address:

Prevention 1st

c/o Lifespan

1900 South Clinton Avenue

Rochester, NY 14618

A Year of Safety

With so much stress in our daily lives, it can seem overwhelming to add tasks for checking your home safety. The danger is that we may keep putting them off. But safety strategies don’t have to take a lot of time. In the months ahead we’ll be reminding you of simple but effective safety checks you can take to keep yourself and your family safe:

January

Be sure you’re using sanitizers and disinfectants correctly, to make them safe and effective. Learn how here.

February

Check those space heaters.

March

Plan your escape in case of fire.

April

Check for overloaded outlets and frayed cords to prevent electrical fires.

May

Review the safe pool rules with your family.

June

Check the fit on your child’s bike helmet—and your own.

July

Move that grill away from your house, and other outdoor fire safety moves.

August

Have your furnace checked before heating season begins.

September

For National Grandparents Day, do a safety and hazard check of your parents home. Better yet, have the grandchildren help do it!

October

Check your smoke (and CO) alarms.

November

Company’s coming—check your home for hazards to young children and older adults.

December

Make sure holiday lighting stays festive.

Use Disinfectants Correctly

Regular use of disinfectants has become routine in many homes. Most doctors and researchers say disinfectants are safe and effective when used correctly. This is a good time to double check how you’re using them.

Keep disinfectants on surfaces, not yourself.

Disinfecting products that use bleach or quaternary ammonium compounds (quats) are considered safe if used as directed. But be sure to use them in properly ventilated rooms to avoid inhaling them, which can cause irritation in some people, and wear gloves when applying. The EPA recommends using non-aerosol sprays or wipes.

Give them time to work.

Check the product label to know how long to leave the disinfectant on a surface before wiping. Typically they recommend leaving the surface visibly wet for 4-10 minutes

Check your hand sanitizer.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends checking that your hand sanitizer has at least a 60% concentration of alcohol to be effective. Also check to make sure it hasn’t expired—evaporation can lower the effectiveness of sanitizers—and check this FDA list of sanitizers to avoid because of toxic additions or inadequate levels of alcohol.

Be extra careful with disinfectants around children

Young children can be effected by smaller amounts of disinfectant than adults. And children are also more likely to ingest them because they put their hands in their mouths. Wipe off bleach- and quat-based products after they’ve been on the surface for the necessary amount of time to disinfect (see above).

For more tips and instructions for how to make your own bleach solution, check here.

Yes, Light Up the Darkness—Just Do It Safely

In December, the darkest month, holiday lights and candles have always been hugely popular. This year, we’re even more inclined to light the darkness. As early as September, stores were already reporting strong sales of holiday lights and decorations. It’s only expected to increase, as we retreat into our homes during the coronavirus surge in the winter months.

Decorating our homes with light can bring great comfort. Just make sure to do it safely:

  • Consider flameless battery-operated candles, which are becoming very widely available, give a realistic glow, and can last longer than flaming candles.
  • If you use traditional candles, keep them at least 12 inches away from anything that might burn—that includes furniture, bedding, curtains and decorations. Put them out before everyone leaves the room.
  • Always unplug tree and holiday lights before leaving home or going to bed.
  • Avoid overloading outlets. Flickering lights, tripped circuit breakers, and blown fuses are warning signs. Don’t ignore them – unplug!

Find more simple steps to holiday candle and light safety here.

Time to Change Your Clock and Check Your Alarms

People often debate the value of Daylight Saving Time. But there’s no debating the value of using this biannual change as a reminder to check your smoke alarm and CO detectors.

Even for smoke alarms that have long-life batteries—or are hard-wired—it’s still important to make sure the alarm is working. Not every single long-life battery will work for 10 years, and even hard-wired alarms can fail. So yes, you should still test your smoke alarms at least twice a year — once a month is better, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association. Replace smoke alarms after 10 years.  

This is also a good time to check your CO detectors. Press and hold the Test Button on the front of the alarm until the alarm sounds (it may take up to 20 seconds). And look on the back, or near the battery compartment, for the date of manufacture. Most have a lifespan of no more than 7 years. Once you know your alarms are working, make sure everyone in your home knows what to do when the alarm goes off. Getting out may be more complicated than you think, especially if there are young children or people with disabilities in your home. And anyone may find it hard to respond quickly if the alarm goes off in the middle of the night. Go to homefiredrill.org to learn how to plan and practice a home fire drill.

Golf Tournament Raises $43,000+ to Prevent Injuries

The 2020 Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament raised more than $43,000 to benefit Prevention 1st and help us prevent injuries all year long.

Ninety golfers turned out on a beautiful September day at Irondequoit Country Club. Congratulations to our winning golfers:

Overall men’s winners: Eric Koehler, Ryan Wegman, Zach Buschner, and Joel Chiarenza.

Overall mixed winners:  Sharon Stiller, Duwaine Bascoe, Maureen Bass, and Anthony Giordano.

Many thanks to our hard-working 2020 Golf Committee: Co-chairs Jessica Holly and Michael Chatwin; Harvey Bunis; Jack Dinaburg; Eric Koehler; Stewart Moscov; Sarabeth Rogoff; and Scott Rogoff.

Tournament Sponsors

Abrams Fensterman, LLP

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Ralph Honda

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC          

Flag Sponsors

Barclay Damon, LLP

Brown & Brown of New York, Inc.

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Harvey Bunis

Community Health Strategies

Cooley Group, Inc.

Cathy & Jack Dinaburg

Rick Glazer and Family

Golisano Children’s Hospital

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Sharon Stiller

Tee Sponsors

Bell Cornerstone

Canandaigua National Bank & Trust

Robert Cole & Daryl Sharp

Ernstrom & Dreste LLP

Flaherty Salmin CPAs

Graham Construction

Heritage Financial Services, LLC

Key Bank

Mengel Metzger Barr & Co.

Debbie & David Pelusio

Perlo’s Restaurant

Ralph Honda

Senator Joe Robach

Rochester Area Community Foundation, Developmental Disabilities Giving Circle

Rochester Fire Department, Fire Safety Division

Rochester Hardwood Floor

Bret & Heather Rogoff

Sage Rutty and Co., Inc.

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC

Three Ladies and Kevin

Webster Schubel & Meier, LLP