FILMS ON FIRE! Prevention 1st Short Film Competition

FILMS ON FIRE! Prevention 1st Short Film Competition

Prevention 1st, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, invites young filmmakers to submit a short film on the topic of INJURY PREVENTION, FIRE PREVENTION, or FIRE SAFETY to the Prevention 1st Short Film Competition. No entry fee. No purchase necessary to enter or win.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS

SUBMIT YOUR FILM

Films on Fire proudly accepts entries via FilmFreeway.com, the world’s best online submission platform. FilmFreeway offers free HD online screeners, unlimited video storage, digital press kits, and more. Click to submit with FilmFreeway.

ELIGIBILITY
The competition is open to residents of the greater Rochester, New York area, defined as Rochester, Monroe County, and the surrounding Livingston, Ontario, Orleans, and Wayne counties.

This competition is open to individuals, classes, or groups. In the case of a class or a group, a team leader or teacher should be named as representative for submission purposes.

Staff members of Prevention 1st and their family members, as well as members of the Jury and their family members, may submit Entries, but such Entries are not eligible to be a Winner.

CATEGORIES
Middle School (grades 6 through 8)
High School (grades 9 through 12)

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
As this is a competition for young filmmakers, all entrants under age 18 must have a parent or guardian sign off on entries. In the case of school classes or other groups, the adult in charge is responsible for securing the permission of participants’ parent or guardian.

Each video submitted to the competition must be under three minutes in length, and must comply with the rules. Entries should be “G-Rated,” containing no inappropriate language or violence.

Video Submissions must be submitted via FilmFreeway with a Vimeo or Youtube link.

Video Submissions of all genres and styles will be accepted. The videos may be recorded in any language, but English subtitles are highly encouraged for those not produced in English. All video submissions must tell a story to help raise awareness about injury prevention, fire prevention, or fire safety, as further described by the judging criteria.

Entries must be original works. If the submission contains media (including music) created by someone else, permission must be obtained and provided upon request. Prevention 1st encourages the use of royalty-free or Creative Commons music.

RELEASE FORMS
Whenever making a film that will be shown online, it’s important to get permission from anyone who appears in the final piece. That applies to music used within the film as well. To that end, Prevention 1st offers simple MUSIC RELEASE and TALENT RELEASE forms. If your film is to be considered as a finalist, you must be prepared to provide Prevention 1st with those completed forms.

ENTRY PROCEDURE
Entries must be submitted via the Prevention 1st website between 6:00 p.m. EST on October 1, 2018 and 11:59 p.m. EST January 25, 2019. The first 200 entries received will be considered for competition. See our website www.prevention1st.org/fof2019 for official rules, release forms, guidelines, and submission link. Submissions will be accepted through Film Freeway at www.filmfreeway.com/prevention1st

SCREENING PROCESS
Prevention 1st shall organize a Competition Committee. The Competition Committee will verify that the Entrant and the Entry meets the eligibility criteria. The Competition Committee may disqualify any Entry that it deems inappropriate.

JUDGING CRITERIA AND SCORING PROCEDURE
Prevention 1st will organize a committee of individuals (the “Jury”), to decide winners based on the competition criteria. Criteria can include, but are not limited to, writing, acting, educational value, editing, production value, and artistic expression. All decisions of the competition committee and jury are final.

SOCIAL MEDIA VOTING
The Competition Committee will announce its list of eligible films via email and social media. Filmmakers competing for the social media prize should share their video on Facebook and Instagram with the hashtags #Prevention1st and #FilmsOnFire. Number of shares will be counted on February 25, 2019.

PRIZES
Middle School Category:
Jury winner: $250
Social media winner: $100

High School Category:
Jury winner: $250
Social media winner: $100

NOTIFICATION AND RECEIPT OF PRIZES
Winners will be announced March 1, 2019 via email and social media. Every reasonable attempt will be made to deliver prizes before April 1, 2019.

COMPETITION TERMS
Each entrant (with parent/guardian) grants to Prevention 1st a non-exclusive license to use the film for the festival and other promotional or educational purposes for all media, worldwide in perpetuity. Filmmakers retain the copyright to their works.

The entrants shall hold Prevention 1st harmless, and discharges those involved with the competition from any and all claims, losses, or damages.

GUIDELINES FOR CONTENT
See our MESSAGING SHEET for ideas! It contains possible phrases and topics to make your movie about. Since we emphasize fire safety, the use of actual fire is prohibited in any video entry. Visit www.prevention1st.org/fof2019

FILMMAKING TIPS
See our FILMMAKING INFO SHEET for tips on as storyboarding, script-writing, good shooting practices, recording audio, editing, and finalizing your video. Visit www.prevention1st.org/fof2019

WINNER NOTIFICATION
Publicity updates and winner announcements will be posted at www.prevention1st.org as well as our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/prevention1stroc

Child-Resistant Caps Still Need You to Prevent Medication Overdoses

Child-resistant caps on medication bottles have helped reduce fatal poisonings of young children in the U.S. since they were mandated decades ago. But they can only protect children if they’re in place.

The holiday season brings visits to and from friends and families of all ages. Grandparents and adults who don’t usually have young children under the same roof may need to be reminded to carefully replace the cap on medications and keep medication bottles out of sight and reach.

Medications have overtaken household products such as cleaning fluids as the leading cause of child poisonings, and the number of ED visits and calls to poison control centers for medication overdoses is rising. Between 2005 and 2009, ED visits for medication overdoses among children younger than 5 years rose 20%.*

The peak incidence for unintentional medication overdoses is in 2-year-olds. It’s an age when young children are developing greater ability to move around on their own—and when their ability to reach surfaces previously out of reach can increase unexpectedly from one week to the next.

For all ages, analgesics (painkillers) are the #1 substance involved in poisonings reported to poison control centers, responsible for 11% of such poisonings.

The initiative Preventing Overdoses and Treatment Exposures Task Force (PROTECT) is promoting development of a new generation of safety packaging to limit the amount of medication a child could ingest even if a child-resistant cap has not been re-secured properly.

Acknowledging that even enhanced safety packaging will not be 100% “child-proof,” PROTECT has also launched the “Up and Away” public education campaign to promote safe use and storage of medications. Among their suggestions:  program the national poison control number (800-222-1222) into your cell phone.

Find more tips for preventing poisonings and other injuries in Prevention 1st’s Safety Resources.

*Data from the National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, and Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

When the Smoke Alarm Goes Off, Get Out. You Have Less Time Than You Think.

Fire and smoke spread faster in modern homes.

Having a working smoke alarm, responding right away when it sounds, and having and practicing a plan to get out quickly are more crucial today than ever.

Modern homes are more susceptible to rapid fire spread, according to a study* by UL, a global safety certification company. The average U.S. home size has increased 56% since 1980, and more homes have two stories. The larger the home, the more air is available to sustain and grow a fire. Newer homes are also more likely to incorporate open floor plans, taller ceilings, great rooms and two-story foyers, which can contribute to rapid smoke and fire spread.

Modern building materials and furnishings are also more likely to include faster-burning synthetic materials and/or combustible materials.

UL conducted a number of fire experiments involving rooms made with either modern or “legacy” materials (contents that might have been found in a mid-20th century house), recording the time it took for “flashover” (a fire spreading very rapidly across a gap because of intense heat) to occur. These experiments found that while flashover took 29 minutes or more in legacy rooms, in modern rooms it took less than 5 minutes. In addition, modern windows and doors fail more rapidly than their legacy counterparts, which can allow more air in to fuel the fire.

Average fire department time to residential fires from 2004 to 2009 was approximately 6.4 minutes according to the National Fire Incident Reporting System.

A working smoke alarm can reduce your risk of dying in a fire by 50%–if it is working, you respond to it immediately, and you can get out quickly, even in darkness. Here’s how to keep yourself and your family safer:

  1. Test your smoke alarms, ideally monthly, even if they have long-life batteries or are hard-wired.
  2. Plan ahead, and know how everyone in your home will get out, especially from bedrooms.
  3. Keep bedroom doors closed; whether modern or legacy they provide a barrier against smoke and heat. Feel the door with the back of your hand. If it’s hot, put down a towel or other material to keep out smoke, and go to a window to exit or signal to firefighters.
  4. If the alarm sounds, don’t waste time looking for the source—get out, then call 9-1-1.

*Kerber, S. Analysis of Changing Residential Fire Dynamics, UL, 2012.

How Safe Is Your Airbnb?

How Safe Is Your Airbnb?

When searching for your next Airbnb you might check out location, number of bedrooms, and whether it has a kitchen. But what about fire safety?

A study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed Airbnb listings across 17 countries. It found that less than half of Airbnb venues that allow smoking are equipped with smoke detectors, while nearly two-thirds of venues that do not allow smoking are equipped with smoke detectors.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, smoking was the leading cause of home fire deaths in the U.S. for the five year period of 2012-2016. Overall, one of every 31 home smoking material fires resulted in death.

A working smoke alarm can cut your risk of dying in a fire by 50%–but it must be working. Test smoke alarms when you arrive at your Airbnb, and take note of all exits and the pathways to them. Think about how you will get out if the alarm sounds in the middle of the night. Be sure to keep pathways free of clutter.

If you smoke, use only fire-safe cigarettes, use a deep sturdy ashtray, don’t discard cigarettes in vegetation such as potted plants, and never smoke in bed.

Join Us Oct. 27…

To say goodbye to Molly Clifford and wish her well in her January move to Philadelphia, with a fun-and-fundraising Football Party to benefit Prevention 1st and Mary’s Place Refugee Outreach:

McGinnity’s Restaurant and Party House

534 West Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14615

Philadelphia Eagles v. Buffalo Bills

12:30pm to game end!

$30 /person or $50/couple

R.S.V.P. by Monday, October 21 to info@prevention1st.org

Please make checks payable to Prevention First Foundation.

Golf Tournament Raises $44,000+ to Prevent Injuries

The 2019 Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament was our biggest fundraiser yet, raising more than $44,000 to benefit Prevention 1st.

This year 104 golfers turned out, with 144 people attending the post-tournament dinner at Midvale Country Club. Harvey Bunis and Scott Rogoff were our outstanding MCs for the dinner program.

Congratulations to our winning golfers:

1st Place Men’s (59): Eric Koehler, Joel Chiarenza, Zachary Buschner, Ryan Wegman

1st Place Mixed (70): Tom Marletta, Chuck Marletta, Jason Warner, Darlene Tool

Closest to the Pin # 4 (Men): Michael Pattison, 3’2”           

Closest to the Pin # 4 (Women): Shelley VanLare, 28’01”

Closest to the Line #7 (Men): Michael Cimino

Closest to the Line #7 (Women): Heidi Burke

SKINS

Hole #2,3 Birdie (3,4) Jared Dinaburg, Cliff White, Scott Chase, Griffin Byrns

Hole #10 Eagle (3) Scott Rogoff, Brett Rogoff

Hole #13 Birdie (2) Peter Cook, David Cook, Kyle Bennett, Ed Cook

Thanks to all of our golfers and attendees, and to Midvale Country Club for their outstanding service and support.

And special thanks to our 2019 Golf Committee: Co-chairs Jessica Holly and Michael Chatwin; Harvey Bunis; Molly Clifford; Jack Dinaburg; Kristin Fulford; Rick Glazer; Eric Koehler; Stewart Moscov; David Pelusio; Sarabeth Rogoff; Scott Rogoff, and Joan Updaw.

Tournament Sponsors

Abrams Fensterman, LLP

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Ralph Honda

Sage Rutty

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC          

Flag Sponsors

Barclay Damon, LLP

Community Health Strategies

Cooley Group, Inc.

Cathy & Jack Dinaburg

Dolomite Products Company, Inc.

Glazer Family

Debbie & David Pelusio

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC

Tee Sponsors

Abrams Fensterman, LLP

Barclay Damon, LLP

Bell Cornerstone

Browncroft Family Restaurant

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Harvey S. Bunis, Esq.

Canandaigua National Bank

Citizens for Joseph Robach

Molly Clifford

Robert Cole & Daryl Sharp

Cook Properties

Mark Crandall

Developmental Disabilities Giving Circle

Ernstrom & Dreste LLP

Fire Chief John Caufield and Susan Walz

First American Title Insurance Company

Flaherty Salmin CPAs

Graham Construction

Greater Rochester Health Foundation

Heritage Financial Services, LLC

Kevin & Three Ladies

Kiwanis West Central

Mengel Metzger Barr & Co, LLP

Palmer Food Services

Perlo’s Restaurant

Perri’s Pizzeria at the Brighton Pub

Pickle Factory

Ralph Honda

Rochester Area Community Foundation

Rochester Hardwood Floor

Heather & Brett Rogoff

Ruda Investment Group

James Sheppard

Sage Rutty and Co.

Sign Design

Sharon P. Stiller

The Insurance Marketplace Agency

Trillium Health

Upstate Special Needs Planning

Webster Schubel Meier Elder Law

West Webster Volunteer Firemen’s Association, Inc.

‘Safe at Home’ Graduates Gain Safety and Pride

Sheryl Watts

Sheryl Watts, a Safe at Home trainer for Prevention 1st, sees firsthand the positive effect the program has on individuals and their families

Recently she worked with Christopher, a young man who lives with his parents and was excited every week about what he was learning. And he loved sharing his knowledge, often saying at the end of his session with Sheryl: “I can’t wait for Dad to come home so I can teach him this!”

His excitement rose highest at the final session, when he was able to perform all the safety techniques he’d learned without prompting. When Sheryl told him he was officially graduated and would get a certificate, his reveled in his accomplishment:  “I can’t believe I did that!”

Safe at Home trainers all have a fire safety background. Sheryl also works full-time at Lifetime Assistance, where she is in charge of fire safety.  Each training starts with an assessment of any fire hazards in the home, and for this Sheryl often teams up with another trainer who has experience as a firefighter.

At the first session she also assesses the current fire safety knowledge of the person being trained.  Then in 30-45 minute in-home weekly sessions, Sheryl teaches them about cooking safety, identifying fire hazards, locating and testing smoke alarms, exiting when the alarm goes off, and calling 9-1-1. Each week the previous week’s lessons are also reviewed.

Training may last from 3 weeks to 8 weeks depending on the person’s knowledge at the beginning and how well they retain new knowledge. At the end of each of Christopher’s sessions, Sheryl talked about what he had learned with his mother, who worked with him between weekly sessions.

“Actually practicing the techniques is important,” explains Sheryl. “Christopher learned how to exit his bedroom safely if the alarm goes off:  test the door using the back of the hand, take a cell phone and shoes, and if the door is hot how to block smoke from under the door and go to the window to signal for help”.

Safe at Home is customized to the individual. Sheryl has worked with one young woman with autism who wasn’t very verbal.  So they made picture cards together and then used them as part of learning.

“I’d ask ‘There’s a noise going off, what could that be?’ And she’d point to the alarm, “ Sheryl explains.  “We’d lay out the cards in a sequence showing what might make the alarm go off—fire—and what we should do next—an exit.”

All of Sheryl’s trainees have one thing in common:  “They really want to learn, and to be safe.”

Seeing the sense of accomplishment they get from their achievements is very rewarding for Sheryl. So is their determination to apply what they’ve learned. For example, at the beginning of his training Christopher could find the smoke alarm but didn’t know how to test it. Sheryl demonstrated the test button and they discussed how important it is that the alarm is always working. Now Christopher is looking forward to testing those alarms–with his father–every month.

Win a Vacation, TV and More at the Golf Tournament

Even if you don’t golf, the Jane & Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st is the place to be September 16! Silent auction items available at the post-tournament dinner at Midvale Country Club include a trip to Hawaii, a 60-inch television, and golf packages for Irondequoit, Midvale, Brooklea and Seneca Hickory Stick golf courses.

Also at the dinner, the winner will be drawn from the raffle tickets now on sale for a trip for two to Hilton Head’s iconic Harbour Town Golf Club. All proceeds from raffle ticket sales will support the Prevention 1st Safe at Home scholarship fund, providing customized in-home safety training to people with developmental disabilities. Tickets for “dinner only” are available. Download the 2019 tournament brochure.

Please contact one of the following with questions or to register:
Jessica Holly (co-chair): jbdinaburg@gmail.com
Michael Chatwin (co-chair): mchatwin@logs.com
Jack Dinaburg: jackdinaburg@prevention1st.org, (585) 383-6505

Safe at Home a “Next Step” for Adults With Disabilities

Safe at Home, which provides in-home safety assessment and training to reduce the risks of fire and injury in the home, was introduced to many parents, caregivers, teens and adults with intellectual and development disabilities at the recent Next Steps conference sponsored by AutismUp. The conference focused on transitioning to an adult life and living more independently.

“The people who stopped by our booth said they had never encountered anything like Safe at Home before, and they seemed very impressed,” Safe at Home trainer Bob Crandall reported. “One person also thought it would be good for her elderly mother who still lives alone.”

Learn more about Safe at Home here.

Milwaukee Students Stay Safe With“Before the Fire”

All second-graders in Milwaukee Public Schools will be learning lessons from Prevention 1st’s Before the Fire: Prevention Works curriculum as part of their Learning Journeys.  The free program includes lesson plans with learning objectives, activities, and links to resources.

Learning Journeys are beyond-the-classroom learning experiences. As part of theirs, more than 5,000 second-graders from 133 elementary schools will attend the Milwaukee Fire Departments Education Center’s Survive Alive House.

“The lessons in Before the Fire: Prevention Works! will be excellent to use prior to and after their Learning Journey”, said Michelle Wade, Learning Journeys Coordinator.

The free Before the Fire program was created by educators and fire safety experts to provide effective fire safety lesson plans for teachers, preschool and day care providers, parents and caregivers  to teach children about fire, fire prevention, and escaping a fire.