FILMS ON FIRE! Prevention 1st Short Film Competition

FILMS ON FIRE! Prevention 1st Short Film Competition

Prevention 1st, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, invites young filmmakers to submit a short film on the topic of INJURY PREVENTION, FIRE PREVENTION, or FIRE SAFETY to the Prevention 1st Short Film Competition. No entry fee. No purchase necessary to enter or win.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS

SUBMIT YOUR FILM

Films on Fire proudly accepts entries via FilmFreeway.com, the world’s best online submission platform. FilmFreeway offers free HD online screeners, unlimited video storage, digital press kits, and more. Click to submit with FilmFreeway.

ELIGIBILITY
The competition is open to residents of the greater Rochester, New York area, defined as Rochester, Monroe County, and the surrounding Livingston, Ontario, Orleans, and Wayne counties.

This competition is open to individuals, classes, or groups. In the case of a class or a group, a team leader or teacher should be named as representative for submission purposes.

Staff members of Prevention 1st and their family members, as well as members of the Jury and their family members, may submit Entries, but such Entries are not eligible to be a Winner.

CATEGORIES
Middle School (grades 6 through 8)
High School (grades 9 through 12)

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
As this is a competition for young filmmakers, all entrants under age 18 must have a parent or guardian sign off on entries. In the case of school classes or other groups, the adult in charge is responsible for securing the permission of participants’ parent or guardian.

Each video submitted to the competition must be under three minutes in length, and must comply with the rules. Entries should be “G-Rated,” containing no inappropriate language or violence.

Video Submissions must be submitted via FilmFreeway with a Vimeo or Youtube link.

Video Submissions of all genres and styles will be accepted. The videos may be recorded in any language, but English subtitles are highly encouraged for those not produced in English. All video submissions must tell a story to help raise awareness about injury prevention, fire prevention, or fire safety, as further described by the judging criteria.

Entries must be original works. If the submission contains media (including music) created by someone else, permission must be obtained and provided upon request. Prevention 1st encourages the use of royalty-free or Creative Commons music.

RELEASE FORMS
Whenever making a film that will be shown online, it’s important to get permission from anyone who appears in the final piece. That applies to music used within the film as well. To that end, Prevention 1st offers simple MUSIC RELEASE and TALENT RELEASE forms. If your film is to be considered as a finalist, you must be prepared to provide Prevention 1st with those completed forms.

ENTRY PROCEDURE
Entries must be submitted via the Prevention 1st website between 6:00 p.m. EST on October 1, 2018 and 11:59 p.m. EST January 25, 2019. The first 200 entries received will be considered for competition. See our website www.prevention1st.org/fof2019 for official rules, release forms, guidelines, and submission link. Submissions will be accepted through Film Freeway at www.filmfreeway.com/prevention1st

SCREENING PROCESS
Prevention 1st shall organize a Competition Committee. The Competition Committee will verify that the Entrant and the Entry meets the eligibility criteria. The Competition Committee may disqualify any Entry that it deems inappropriate.

JUDGING CRITERIA AND SCORING PROCEDURE
Prevention 1st will organize a committee of individuals (the “Jury”), to decide winners based on the competition criteria. Criteria can include, but are not limited to, writing, acting, educational value, editing, production value, and artistic expression. All decisions of the competition committee and jury are final.

SOCIAL MEDIA VOTING
The Competition Committee will announce its list of eligible films via email and social media. Filmmakers competing for the social media prize should share their video on Facebook and Instagram with the hashtags #Prevention1st and #FilmsOnFire. Number of shares will be counted on February 25, 2019.

PRIZES
Middle School Category:
Jury winner: $250
Social media winner: $100

High School Category:
Jury winner: $250
Social media winner: $100

NOTIFICATION AND RECEIPT OF PRIZES
Winners will be announced March 1, 2019 via email and social media. Every reasonable attempt will be made to deliver prizes before April 1, 2019.

COMPETITION TERMS
Each entrant (with parent/guardian) grants to Prevention 1st a non-exclusive license to use the film for the festival and other promotional or educational purposes for all media, worldwide in perpetuity. Filmmakers retain the copyright to their works.

The entrants shall hold Prevention 1st harmless, and discharges those involved with the competition from any and all claims, losses, or damages.

GUIDELINES FOR CONTENT
See our MESSAGING SHEET for ideas! It contains possible phrases and topics to make your movie about. Since we emphasize fire safety, the use of actual fire is prohibited in any video entry. Visit www.prevention1st.org/fof2019

FILMMAKING TIPS
See our FILMMAKING INFO SHEET for tips on as storyboarding, script-writing, good shooting practices, recording audio, editing, and finalizing your video. Visit www.prevention1st.org/fof2019

WINNER NOTIFICATION
Publicity updates and winner announcements will be posted at www.prevention1st.org as well as our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/prevention1stroc

Rogoff Scholarship Available for High School Students With Plans to Prevent Injuries

Stephen Rogoff

In August 2018, the Rochester community experienced a sudden loss with the passing of Stephen D. Rogoff. Known for his compassion, humanity, and great ability to connect with others, Stephen was a tremendous friend to Prevention 1st.  He co-founded the organization’s first major fund raiser–a Golf Tournament held at Midvale Country Club in 2013—including recruiting a committee, approaching local businesses to donate prizes, and obtaining dozens of tee sponsors.

In honor and memory of the positive impact that Stephen Rogoff had on so many, his children — Scott, Brett and Robyn — along with their families and the Prevention 1st Board of Directors have established the Stephen and Arlayne Rogoff Scholarship Fund. Each year, $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to two recipients who best demonstrate Stephen’s empathetic and actionable character.  

How to Apply

The scholarship application requires an essay outlining the candidate’s personal experience with a preventable injury or in-home danger and their plans to generate awareness or educate others on such risks. For more information contact info@prevention1st.og.

Support this Scholarship 

If you should like to honor Stephen’s memory or support this scholarship with a donation, click here to make an online contribution. Mail checks, payable to Rochester Area Community Foundation (with Rogoff Scholarship in the Memo Line) to 500 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607.

Poster Contest Winner Pays It Forward

When third-grader Audrey Mathews won first prize for her age group in the Prevention 1st 2018/19 Fire Safety Poster Contest, she knew exactly what she wanted to do with her $50 prize money: she donated it to support her school district’s therapy dog.

Audrey’s parents say she has a love of service and therapy animals because they help keep people calm in emergencies. Audrey’s winning poster delivers a crucial message about responding when the smoke alarm goes off:  “Don’t scream, don’t shout, keep calm and get out.”

As part of Audrey’s prize, her classroom at Scribner Road Elementary School also received a $200 gift certificate for art supplies.

Click here to see all the winning posters.

Other good things coming from the Fire Safety Poster Contest: a ride to school on a fire truck for poster artist Fiston Heca and his sister.

New Smoke Alarms Help, But They’re Not a Cure-All

You still have to provide other pieces of the safety puzzle.

test your smoke alarm
Even smoke alarms with long-life batteries need testing.

Fire departments and injury prevention organizations like Prevention 1st are celebrating the upcoming implementation of New York State’s new smoke alarm requirements.  As of April 1, all smoke alarms sold in New York must have a 10-year, sealed, non-removable battery, which will undoubtedly prevent a significant number of fire deaths and serious injuries.

While most fires happen during the day, most fatal fires occur at night.  Having even one working smoke alarm in your home reduces the chance of dying in a fire by more than half.  It is difficult to find a more effective, accessible and affordable prevention tool, which is why most states require them in the first place.  Yet people still die in fires on a regular basis.  Why? 

Missing or dead batteries!  Well-meaning people, annoyed by the sound of a dying battery, or by one that is doing its job around a smoky kitchen or steamy bathroom, take out the battery.  So do people who are in immediate “need” of a battery for a remote control or other device.  Regardless of reason, most people have every intention of replacing that battery, but just don’t get around to it, with sometimes tragic consequences.

Ten-year smoke alarms, with long-life batteries that are sealed into the unit, will make a big difference in improving safety.  But there are a few things New Yorkers need to know before they install their new ones and forget about them for a decade.

Test your smoke alarm regularly.  Long-life batteries are just that – but “long life” may not be ten years.  Batteries can and do fail, so continue to test them once a month.

Keep it free of dirt and dust.  Alarms are sensitive and finely tuned; like any appliance, they work better when clean!  Use a vacuum hose or duster to remove damaging dirt.

Be ready to replace it before ten years is up.  A 2008 CDC-commissioned study found that after ten years, 78% of smoke alarms with lithium batteries were that were installed through a public outreach program were still operational.  That leaves 22% that were not.  Keep testing!

Don’t forget the other pieces of the safety puzzle.  The time to figure out who is helping children or elderly relatives escape from fire is not the middle of the night with alarms going off and smoke filling your home.  Develop an exit plan with your family and practice it at least twice a year!

The new smoke alarms, while slightly more expensive, will be well worth the cost in lives saved and injuries prevented.  But they are not a cure-all, and taking a few additional steps will help make your home and your family that much safer.

This article also appeared as an op-ed piece by Prevention 1st president Molly Clifford in the March 23,2019 issue of the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle.

Prevention 1st Fire Safety Poster Contest Winners Announced!

Congratulations to our 1st Place Winners in each category:
Rishaan Shah, Kindergarten, Scribner Road Elementary School
Audrey Mathews, 3rd grade, Scribner Road Elementary School
Julia Thomas, 5th grade, St. Joseph School

Honorable mentions go to:
Hyoju Noh, Kindergarten, Cobbles Elementary School
Adaya Sykes, 3rd grade, Sykes Family Homeschool
Addison Zimmerman, 4th grade, Abelard Reynolds School #42

See all the winning posters here.

And congratulations to fifth-grader Fiston Heca, the lucky winner of a random drawing of all poster artists, who will get a ride on a firetruck to Abelard Reynolds School #42, courtesy of the Rochester Fire Department!

Prevention 1st would like to thank this year’s judges for their work in choosing this year’s winners from more than 200 entries from across the County: New York State Senator Joe Robach, Monroe County Fire Coordinator Steve Schalabba, Rochester Fire Marshal Christine Schryver, and the Memorial Art Gallery Education Director Marlene Hamman-Whitmore.

Posters were judged on both artistic merit and the impact of its fire safety message. All participants will receive a certificate and all posters will be displays at the following locations around the city and county during March:

Rochester Public Library Children’s Center (winners and honorable mentions)
Monroe County Office Building
Rochester City Hall
Greater Rochester International Airport
Rochester Museum and Science Center
Eastview Mall The Mall at Greece Ridge
Canandaigua National Bank
Eastside Family YMCA

Board Member Honored for Service to Students With Disabilities

Brett Rogoff

Prevention 1st Board Member Brett Rogoff will be honored at The Cooke School and Institute’s Food for Thought Gala in Manhattan next month. Cooke is recognizing Brett and his team at Strategic Group for their support and partnership in furthering the mission of the school, which provides special education services for students ages 5 through 21 who have mild-to-moderate cognitive or developmental disabilities and severe language-based learning disabilities. The Strategic Group team has hosted Cooke interns, providing these high school and young adult students with real-world work experiences that help them make the transition from the classroom, and find and pursue their passions.

Through Brett’s efforts, Prevention 1st in partnership with Community Health Strategies brought the BIC play safe be safe! fire safety program to The Cooke School. Originally designed for young children, the award-winning interactive program worked perfectly for this new audience of 14- to 18-year-olds who need to develop life skills.

P1st Fire Safety Winning Posters:

1st Place, 5th-6th Grade: Julia Thomas, 5th Grade, St Joseph School

1st Place, 3rd-4th Grade: Audrey Mathews, 3rd Grade, Scribner Rd. Elementary School
1st Place, K-2nd: Rishaan Shah, Kindergarten, Scribner Rd Elementary School
Honorable Mention: Hyoju Noh, Kindergarten, Cobbles Elementary School
Honorable Mention: Adaya Sykes, 3rd Grade, Sykes Family Homeschool

Honorable Mention: Addison Zimmerman, 4th Grade, Abelard Reynolds School #42

Now’s the Time to Check–Maybe Replace–Your CO Alarms

Test your CO alarm today

In 2011, laws passed almost simultaneously in many states required the installation of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms in most houses, apartment buildings, rental dwellings and hotels. Since most CO alarms have a lifespan of no more than 7 years, yours might be expiring right now.

Old units lose efficiency and can put your family at risk of fatal CO poisoning. CO is invisible and odorless, so an early warning from a working CO alarm is crucial. CO can be created when fuels used in heating and cooking equipment don’t burn completely. Vehicles or generators running in an attached garage can also produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide.

Some questions you should ask yourself:

  1. Do I have enough CO alarms (and smoke alarms)? The US Fire Administration recommends installing CO alarms in a central location outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of your home (including the basement).
  2. Do all alarms comply with manufacturer instructions and current guidelines about their shelf life? Check the manufacturer’s recommendations (usually on the back of each unit) for how often your CO alarm will need to be replaced. It’s usually 5 to 7 years.
  3. Do I know that every alarm—both CO and smoke alarm—is working? Even units that have life-long batteries or are hard-wired still need to be checked at least every six months. The US Fire Administration suggests checking each alarm once a month. Learn how to test your CO alarm here.
  4. Will everyone in your home always respond immediately and appropriately when any alarm activates? Have you planned your escape route? Have you practiced it? Could everyone do it even if the alarm sounds in the middle of the night?
  5. Can everyone living in my home hear every alarm from any location—especially from their bedrooms? For those that have significant hearing issues, bed shakers and strobe lights can supplement alarms. For all homes, interconnected alarms are recommended. You can convert existing units, both smoke and CO, to be wirelessly interconnected using products available in stores and online. Learn more from manufacturers First Alert and Kidde.

Protect Your Home From Electrical Fires

The cold weather and darkness this month have us turning on lights, heating and appliances. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, that may be why January is the leading month for electrical fires. Today’s electrical demands can overburden the electrical system in a home, especially homes more than 40 years old that have older wiring, electrical systems, and devices.

Protect yourself and your family by making sure all electrical work in your home is done by a qualified electrician and following these tips from USFA:

  • Always plug major appliances–such as refrigerators, stoves, washers and dryers–directly into a wall outlet. Never use an extension cord with a major appliance.
  • Unplug small appliances when you’re not using them.
  • Keep lamps, light fixtures and light bulbs away from anything that can burn.
  • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or fixture.
  • Check electrical cords on appliances often. Replace cracked, damaged and loose electrical cords.
  • Don’t overload wall outlets.
  • Never force a three-prong cord into a two-slot outlet.
  • Install tamper-resistant electrical outlets if you have young children.
  • Use power strips that have internal overload protection.

Find more home fire prevention tips and information at USFA’s electrical fire safety outreach materials webpage: https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/electrical.html.