Register Now for the Sept. 21 Golf Tournament!

The 2020 Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st will be held on Monday, September 21. This year’s new location is Irondequoit Country Club, 4045 East Avenue, Rochester, NY.

Sponsorships are available, and non-golfers are welcome for dinner following the tournament.

Download the flyer and registration form here.

The event will adhere to all necessary safety guidelines, including table spacing and seating capacity. Golfers may ride two to a cart, however if a golfer wishes to maintain space they may walk and keep their clubs on the cart.

Please contact one of the following with questions:
Jessica Holly (co-chair): jbdinaburg@gmail.com
Michael Chatwin (co-chair): mchatwin@logs.com
Jack Dinaburg, (585) 766-3660

Thank you to our Sponsors!

Buckingham Properties

Sage Rutty

Abrams Fensterman

Ralph Honda

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barack, LLC

Stay Safe When Disinfecting Your Home

Cleaning and disinfecting our homes has taken on new importance during the coronavirus pandemic. To stay safe, it’s equally important to use and store cleaning and disinfecting products properly. The CDC has these tips:

  • Keep cleaning products out of reach in homes with small children and pets.
  • Never mix chlorine bleach with ammonia–or any chemical other than water. This can create deadly gasses. (Note: Bleach can appear on ingredients lists as sodium hypochlorite).
  • Just as you shouldn’t directly mix chemicals in a bottle, be careful about using one product after another on the same surface. If you must use two separate products to clean and disinfect, wipe the surface thoroughly with water to remove all residue from the first product before using the second.
  • When using bleach keep the area well-ventilated.
  • Disinfectant sprays are meant to be used on surfaces, never on the body, pets, or food.

The CDC provides these directions for a proper bleach solution: 5 tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water, OR 4 teaspoons of bleach per quart of water. Make only as much bleach solution as you’ll need right now, because it starts to lose effectiveness after only about a day.

FILMS ON FIRE! Prevention 1st Short Film Competition

FILMS ON FIRE! Prevention 1st Short Film Competition

Prevention 1st, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, invites young filmmakers to submit a short film on the topic of INJURY PREVENTION, FIRE PREVENTION, or FIRE SAFETY to the Prevention 1st Short Film Competition. No entry fee. No purchase necessary to enter or win.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS

SUBMIT YOUR FILM

Films on Fire proudly accepts entries via FilmFreeway.com, the world’s best online submission platform. FilmFreeway offers free HD online screeners, unlimited video storage, digital press kits, and more. Click to submit with FilmFreeway.

ELIGIBILITY
The competition is open to residents of the greater Rochester, New York area, defined as Rochester, Monroe County, and the surrounding Livingston, Ontario, Orleans, and Wayne counties.

This competition is open to individuals, classes, or groups. In the case of a class or a group, a team leader or teacher should be named as representative for submission purposes.

Staff members of Prevention 1st and their family members, as well as members of the Jury and their family members, may submit Entries, but such Entries are not eligible to be a Winner.

CATEGORIES
Middle School (grades 6 through 8)
High School (grades 9 through 12)

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
As this is a competition for young filmmakers, all entrants under age 18 must have a parent or guardian sign off on entries. In the case of school classes or other groups, the adult in charge is responsible for securing the permission of participants’ parent or guardian.

Each video submitted to the competition must be under three minutes in length, and must comply with the rules. Entries should be “G-Rated,” containing no inappropriate language or violence.

Video Submissions must be submitted via FilmFreeway with a Vimeo or Youtube link.

Video Submissions of all genres and styles will be accepted. The videos may be recorded in any language, but English subtitles are highly encouraged for those not produced in English. All video submissions must tell a story to help raise awareness about injury prevention, fire prevention, or fire safety, as further described by the judging criteria.

Entries must be original works. If the submission contains media (including music) created by someone else, permission must be obtained and provided upon request. Prevention 1st encourages the use of royalty-free or Creative Commons music.

RELEASE FORMS
Whenever making a film that will be shown online, it’s important to get permission from anyone who appears in the final piece. That applies to music used within the film as well. To that end, Prevention 1st offers simple MUSIC RELEASE and TALENT RELEASE forms. If your film is to be considered as a finalist, you must be prepared to provide Prevention 1st with those completed forms.

ENTRY PROCEDURE
Entries must be submitted via the Prevention 1st website between 6:00 p.m. EST on October 1, 2018 and 11:59 p.m. EST January 25, 2019. The first 200 entries received will be considered for competition. See our website www.prevention1st.org/fof2019 for official rules, release forms, guidelines, and submission link. Submissions will be accepted through Film Freeway at www.filmfreeway.com/prevention1st

SCREENING PROCESS
Prevention 1st shall organize a Competition Committee. The Competition Committee will verify that the Entrant and the Entry meets the eligibility criteria. The Competition Committee may disqualify any Entry that it deems inappropriate.

JUDGING CRITERIA AND SCORING PROCEDURE
Prevention 1st will organize a committee of individuals (the “Jury”), to decide winners based on the competition criteria. Criteria can include, but are not limited to, writing, acting, educational value, editing, production value, and artistic expression. All decisions of the competition committee and jury are final.

SOCIAL MEDIA VOTING
The Competition Committee will announce its list of eligible films via email and social media. Filmmakers competing for the social media prize should share their video on Facebook and Instagram with the hashtags #Prevention1st and #FilmsOnFire. Number of shares will be counted on February 25, 2019.

PRIZES
Middle School Category:
Jury winner: $250
Social media winner: $100

High School Category:
Jury winner: $250
Social media winner: $100

NOTIFICATION AND RECEIPT OF PRIZES
Winners will be announced March 1, 2019 via email and social media. Every reasonable attempt will be made to deliver prizes before April 1, 2019.

COMPETITION TERMS
Each entrant (with parent/guardian) grants to Prevention 1st a non-exclusive license to use the film for the festival and other promotional or educational purposes for all media, worldwide in perpetuity. Filmmakers retain the copyright to their works.

The entrants shall hold Prevention 1st harmless, and discharges those involved with the competition from any and all claims, losses, or damages.

GUIDELINES FOR CONTENT
See our MESSAGING SHEET for ideas! It contains possible phrases and topics to make your movie about. Since we emphasize fire safety, the use of actual fire is prohibited in any video entry. Visit www.prevention1st.org/fof2019

FILMMAKING TIPS
See our FILMMAKING INFO SHEET for tips on as storyboarding, script-writing, good shooting practices, recording audio, editing, and finalizing your video. Visit www.prevention1st.org/fof2019

WINNER NOTIFICATION
Publicity updates and winner announcements will be posted at www.prevention1st.org as well as our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/prevention1stroc

Be Safe When Choosing Hand Sanitizers

Hand sanitizer has become a staple on our shopping lists. But some of the supply being produced to meet the demand is either not effective or downright dangerous, according to the Food & Drug Administration.

The FDA’s list of over 100 hand sanitizers to be avoided includes products with inadequate levels of alcohol, as well as those containing potentially dangerous methanol.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that, when soap and water are not available, alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60 percent ethanol should be used. The FDA. has found at least 4 hand sanitizers with inadequate concentrations of ethanol, including: NeoNatural, Medicare Alcohol Antiseptic Topical Solution, Datsen Hand Sanitizer and Alcohol Antiseptic 62 Percent Hand Sanitizer.

The FDA has also reported a sharp increase in hand sanitizer products that have tested positive for methanol contamination. Methanol, or wood alcohol, can be toxic when absorbed through the skin and can be life-threatening if ingested. Don’t expect methanol to be listed on the ingredients: Check the list of hand sanitizers to be avoided.

8-Year-Olds’ Summer Camp for Younger Kids Raises Funds for Prevention 1st

Camp;bell Rogoff with her friend and co-counselor Lily Rae.
Campbell Rogoff (right) with her co-counselor Lily Rae

Eight-year-old Campbell Rogoff got the idea while playing with a 5-year-old neighbor in the Rogoff’s pool:  “We could call this Camp Campbell”. She talked with her friend Lily Rae, also 8, about making Camp Campbell official.

“We thought it would be great that kids can get out, and be with other kids,” said Campbell. Their day camp would have a variety of activities and charge a reasonable camp fee.

Lily Rae suggested a business model: they needed a ‘trial’ day to see if the idea would fly. When four kids came on the trial day and “everyone loved it,” the girls knew they had a winning model. When Camp Campbell officially opened on a Wednesday, they had nine campers ages 4-6 years old. By the second camp day on Friday, nine new and returning campers showed up.

Campbell’s parents knew just how successful their daughter’s idea was when they got a call from someone they didn’t even know. 

“A mother had heard ‘Camp Campbell’ was open and wanted to know how to enroll her child!” recalls Campbell’s father Brett.

“Miss Campbell” and “Miss Lily Rae,” as their nametags identified them, provided lots of activities besides swimming in the pool. The campers enjoyed making and playing with water balloons, ‘slime,’ and bubble mix, as well as—the favorite—whacking a pinata. Along with the fun they were also taught important pool safety rules, such as staying in the shallow end of a pool if you haven’t yet learned to swim.

Camp Campbell raised $100 in camp fees. Campbell discussed it with her family and decided to donate the money to Prevention 1st, of which Brett Rogoff is a Board member. The Rogoffs have added their own donation to this, introducing the girls to another model: the matching gift.

It may be possible to be too successful. One mom reported her son had begged: “Let’s go to Camp Campbell every day!”

Every day might be a bit too much work. But Campbell and Lily Rae do plan to bring back Camp Campbell later this summer. After all, the demand is there. And they’ve got a winning model.

When Fire Moves Outside

A campfire casts a warm glow and a sense of adventure—even if it’s in your own backyard. Cooking dinner outside on a grill can make any meal “our favorite!” This year, being outside is a special pleasure. As we move outdoors and bring fire with us, it’s important to bring safety as well.

  • Pick your spot carefully. Whether it’s a grill or firepit, make sure it’s well away from houses and sheds, vehicles, shrubs and trees including low-hanging branches.
  • Enforce a “3-Foot Rule” just as you do for the stove. Keep children and pets at least three feet from the fire or grill.
  • Never use gasoline or kerosene on either a grill or a campfire.  If you’re using starter fluid with your grill, never put the fluid on a hot grill. Make sure lighter fluids are stored securely and away from children.
  • Resist the belief that bigger is better when it comes to campfires! A roaring blaze can more easily get out of control, and can send embers long distances.
  • Just as you wouldn’t leave the stove unattended, never leave your campfire or grill unattended. Put a campfire out completely before you go to bed. When you’re done with a charcoal grill, let the coals cool completely before moving or storing it.
  • Store lighters and matches out of sight and reach of children.
  • Model safe behavior for your children, treating fire with respect. Avoid assigning fire tasks to children too young to understand fire risk or react if something unexpected happens. To learn more about what children understand about fire.

Kids at Home

With many schools closed and parents working from home due to coronavirus, many households are disrupted. As you try to establish normal routines for these abnormal times, keep safety in mind:

  • Tripping hazards—toys, shoes, books on the floor—can accumulate quickly when kids are home all day. To prevent falls and keep pathways clear if you need to get out quickly on case of fire, make “pick up” a regular part of kids’ routines.
  • Maintain a “child-free zone” around a hot cooktop and oven. Children ages 8 and younger can help in the kitchen, but only with activities that don’t involve heat or knives. Check out Kids in the Kitchen for what kitchen responsibilities are appropriate at different ages. And while you’re cooking more at home, make sure you’re Modeling Kitchen Fire Safety.
  • Looking for activities to do with your kids? If you haven’t planned—or recently reviewed—your home fire escape plan now could be the perfect time. Learn how at www.homefiredrill.org

Online activities for kids:

Mikey Makes a Mess – a children’s book by Fireproof Children

Help Mikey Make It Out – an award-winning online teaching game

Cooking Safely at Home

With restaurants closed in many states and communities, we will certainly be cooking more at home. So, it’s’ a good time the remember that cooking is a leading cause of house fires – make sure it doesn’t happen to you!

60% of house fires start in the kitchen, but these fires can be prevented!  Take these simple steps to keep your family safe:

  • Don’t leave the kitchen when cooking on the stovetop.
  • Keep the stovetop area clean and free of clutter.
  • Tie back hair and loose clothing.
  • Keep a lid nearby to slide over a small grease fire and keep it on until the pan is cool–NEVER put water on a grease fire.

Frying is a leading cause of kitchen fires – stay safe AND healthy and consider baking or broiling your food instead!

Kids in the Kitchen

Cooking Matters: Modeling Kitchen Fire Safety

Protect Your Family From Fire

Protege a su Familia de un Incendio

Protect Your Family From Scalds and Burns

Find more information on kitchen safety and other prevention tips, here.

Prevention 1st Fire Safety Poster Contest Winners Announced!


NYS Senator Joe Robach, Marlene Hamman-Whitmore and
Rochester Fire Marshal Christine Schryver judge the posters

Talented young artists from schools throughout the area–RCSD Abelard Reynolds School #42, Cobbles Elementary School, East Rochester School, Harris Hill Elementary School, Honeoye Falls Manor School, RCSD Pinnacle School #35, Scribner Road Elementary School, St. Joseph School, and the Charles Finney School–contributed posters to the contest this year.

Congratulations to our 1st Place Winners in each category:


Rishaan Shah, 1st Grade, Scribner Road Elementary School

Juliette LaBarr, 4th Grade, The Charles Finney School

Alyssa Klawon, 5th Grade, RCSD School #42

Honorable mentions go to:


Youngju Noh, 3 Grade, Cobbles Elementary

Emma Thomas, 1st Grade, St. Joseph School

Abdisadik Ali, 5th Grade, RCSD School #42

Antonio Dixon, 5th grade, RCSD School #42

Hyoju Joanne Noh, 1st Grade, Cobbles Elementary School

And congratulations to fifth-grader D’angelo Dixon, the lucky winner of a random drawing of all poster artists, who will get a ride on a firetruck to RCSD Abelard Reynolds School #42, courtesy of the Rochester Fire Department!

Prevention 1st would like to thank this year’s judges for their work in choosing this year’s winners:  New York State Senator Joe Robach, Rochester Fire Marshal Christine Schryver, and Memorial Art Gallery Education Director Marlene Hamman-Whitmore.

Posters were judged on both artistic merit and the impact of its fire safety message. All participants will receive a certificate and all posters will be displayed at the following locations around the city and county during March:

Rochester Public Library Children’s Center (winners and honorable mentions)

Monroe County Office Building

Rochester City Hall

Rochester International Airport

Rochester Museum and Science Center

The Mall at Greece Ridge

Marketplace Mall

Canandaigua National Bank

Eastside Family YMCA

Rogoff Scholarship Winner Brings Safety Home

Lauren Ritchie of Lancaster NY, the first winner of the Arlayne & Stephen D. Rogoff Scholarship, learned to prevent injuries through a very personal experience: caring for her beloved grandmother.

The Rogoff Scholarship application requires an essay outlining the candidate’s personal experience with a preventable injury or in-home danger and their plans to generate awareness or educate others on such risks. In her essay, Ritchie wrote of her close relationship with her grandmother, “my first true friend.”  When a near-fatal infection and multiple surgeries left her grandmother needing assistance, prone to falls, and vulnerable to injuries in her own home, “She became more dependent on me and our roles were reversed.”

The steps that Ritchie and her family took to protect her grandmother make a good checklist for anyone: They reviewed her home for tripping hazards and removed them, placed night lights, and bought grab bars, non-slip mat, and a shower seat for the bathroom. They installed smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors in main areas and the bedroom, and, crucially, put reminders in family member’s calendars to regularly change each detector’s battery.

With these devices and prevention measures in place, Ritchie wrote, “I began to see her life return to normal again.” Now 91, her grandmother continues to live independently.

Ritchie plans to continue to spread awareness of preventable injuries as a Physician Assistant specializing in gerontology.

The Arlayne & Stephen D. Rogoff Scholarship was established by their children — Scott, Brett and Robyn — along with their families and the Prevention 1st Board of Directors.  Mr. Rogoff was a tremendous friend to Prevention 1st, and co-founded the organization’s first major fund raiser, a Golf Tournament in 2013. The $1,000 scholarships are awarded to recipients who best demonstrate Stephen’s empathetic and actionable character. For more information contact info@prevention1st.og.

Mark Your 2020 Calendar!

The seventh annual Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st will be held Monday, September 20. Board members Michael Chatwin and Jessica Holly will co-chair the event, which this year will move to a new location: Irondequoit Country Club.

The Golf Tournament is a major source of support for Prevention 1st’s injury prevention programs, last year raising more than $44,000. Watch for details and registration information in the coming months.