Sept. 12 is National Grandparents Day: Help Keep Them Safe

Get family involved! Enlisting their grandchildren can be a great way to help older adults receive important reminders about avoiding injuries. Kids can help check for household hazards and look to see that there are smoke alarms. Older kids and teens can help test alarms and help you with other safety checks and tasks. A few things to remember:

  • Check the home for tripping hazards. If there are small rugs, they can be taped down to avoid slipping.
  • Are all the exits clear of furniture and clutter? Would it be easy to get out of the home if the smoke alarm or CO detector goes off?
  • Are night lights needed  in bedrooms, bathrooms and hallways? Make sure there is enough light at the top of stairs.
  • Are stair handrails firm?
  • Does the bathroom need grab bars, a non-slip mat, a shower seat?
  • Are there smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors on each level and outside the bedroom? Remember that smoke alarms should be replaced every ten years and CO alarms every seven years.
  • Test the smoke alarms (including hard-wired ones). Are they working, and just as importantly, can everyone in the home hear the alarms? Basic smoke alarms may be difficult to hear because of their high pitched sound. If your ‘grand’ can’t hear the alarm from the next room, consider a Strobe Alarm which uses an extra bright light, or a Shaker Alarm that uses a vibrating device to shake a bed to awaken someone who wouldn’t hear the alarm without hearing aids.
  • Try this tip from our 2020 Rogoff Scholarship winner: Add a reminder to family members’ calendars to regularly change each alarm’s battery.
  • When was the last time the furnace and chimney were checked or cleaned? You may need to call to schedule a service or cleaning.

Help Make Our Final Golf Tournament the Most Successful Ever

2021 Golf tournament

This year’s Jane & Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament on September 20 is the organization’s last. Prevention 1st is now working with Lifespan to carry out its work in the community.

At this year’s Tournament dinner we will honor several individuals and organizations who have been tremendous supporters of Prevention 1st:

Wayne and Judy Holly, supporters for many years

Buckingham Properties, long-time sponsors of the Golf Tournament

Lifespan, with which Prevention 1t is now working to fuilfill its mission

This year’s Prevention 1st Tournament donations will be made in honor of Stephen Rogoff and Harvey Bunis, who started this tournament to help their dear friend fulfill his dream.

Whether it’s for golf or dinner only, we hope you’ll join us for this very special day. For details and to register click here.

Thank you to our Golf Tournament Sponsors!

Thank You to Our 2021 Golf Tournament Sponsors!

We at Prevention 1st appreciate the tremendous support of our sponsors in making the Jane & Larry

Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament a success!

Tournament Sponsors

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Cook Properties

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Flag Sponsors

Alladin’s of Schoen Place

Cathy & Jack Dinaburg

Abrams Fensterman       

Greater Rochester Health Foundation (GRHF)

LOGS Legal Group

Ralph Honda

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Tee Sponsors

Appelbaum Family

Bell Cornerstone

Browncroft Family Restaurant

CCM Flooring

Cook Properties

Developmental Disabilities Giving Circle

Flaherty Salmin CPAs

Heritage Financial

Kevin Lillis & Friends

Rochester Area Community Foundation (RACF)

Rochester Fire Department

Daryl Sharp & Bob Cole 

WSM Elder Law, P.C. 

Walworth Animal Hospital

Register here for the September 20, 2021 Golf Tournament.

Kindergartner Gets Ride to School in a Fire Truck

Kindergartner Brielle McCarthy received a special prize for participating in the 13th Annual Prevention 1st Fire Safety Poster Contest—a ride to school in a fire truck, courtesy of the St. Paul Fire Department.

Brielle’s classmates at Listwood School in West Irondequoit were on hand to greet her arrival, as were Channel 8 and Spectrum News to cover the story. Watch the video on the school’s Facebook site: https://www.facebook.com/542674739116847/videos/510604729981141

All (K-8) students in Monroe County, New York were eligible to participate in the annual Fire Safety Poster Contest sponsored by Prevention 1st, which included a raffle for the firetruck ride to school. $50 gift cards were awarded to artists in 5 grade categories and their schools received a check for $200. In addition, all teachers who submitted artwork were entered in a raffle for one of ten $500 Staples gift cards. Winning posters were displayed at various locations around the county.

See the winning posters here.

Bicycling Season: Check the Fit on Your Child’s Bike Helmet—and Your Own

More children ages 5-14 go to emergency rooms for bicycle-related injuries than with any other sport, and many of these are head injuries. Whether or not your locale requires  a helmet, make sure your child wears one.  A properly fitted bike helmet can save lives.

Get your child a helmet that fits now, not one to ‘grow into.’ A helmet needs to fit well to provide protection. Here are ‘fit tips’ from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration:

Get the right size helmet:

  1. Measure around your child’s head.
  2. Now try on several helmets in the correct size. Size can vary a bit between different manufacturers.
  3. The helmet should sit level on the head and low on the forehead—not tilting on the back of the head—one or two finger-widths above the eyebrow.

Once you’ve got the right size helmet, adjust it for the right fit:

  1. Adjust the side straps so they form a “V” shape under, and slightly in front of, the ears.
  2. Buckle the chin strap and tighten it. If the straps need to be longer or shorter, take the helmet off to pull the straps from the back of the helmet.
  3. The final step is…a big yawn! With the mouth wide open the helmet should pull down on the head. If it doesn’t, tighten it up.

Do the same for yourself! And be a good role model – wear a helmet for every ride.

Get more bicycle and vehicle safety tips here.

Shopping on Amazon? You can help Prevention 1st

While you shop in the Amazon app, you can help Prevention 1st at no extra cost to you. Just follow the instructions below to select “Prevention First Foundation Inc” as your charity and activate AmazonSmile in the app. They’ll donate a portion of your eligible mobile app purchases to us.

How it works:

1. Open the Amazon app on your phone

2. Select the main menu (=) & tap on “AmazonSmile” within Programs & Features

3. Select “Prevention First Foundation Inc” as your charity

4. Follow the on-screen instructions to activate AmazonSmile in the mobile app

Register now for our September 20 golf tourney

The 2021 tournament will be the most unique ever!

Our tournaments have raised over $250,000. With that money we have helped thousands of people better understand how dangerous unintentional injuries are and how to prevent them. We have provided training to educators, students, firefighters, professionals, parents, children and youth.

Stephen Rogoff and Harvey Bunis started this tournament to help their dear friend fulfill his dream. This year’s Prevention 1st Tournament donations will be made in their honor.

Larry and Jane Glazer

The Jane L. and Larry C. Glazer Charitable Trust and The Arlayne and Stephen Rogoff Educational Fund will also benefit from this year’s tournament. The Larry C. Glazer and Jane L. Glazer Charitable Trust trustees will determine which organizations will receive their funds. The Arlayne and Stephen Rogoff Educational Fund will help special needs educators and students.

This year’s tournament is the organization’s last. Prevention 1st is now working with Lifespan to carry out its mission and community work.  

Please help us make this year’s tournament the best yet. Thank you for all your support!

Download the flyer and registration form here.

A special thank you to our Tournament Sponsors.

Jack Dinaburg

President

2021 Winning Fire Safety Posters Unveiled!

This year’s Prevention 1st Poster Contest received 86 entries submitted by 16 teachers representing 9 local school districts in the Rochester, New York area. Posters are being displayed at the Frederick Douglass Greater Rochester International Airport and will be going up at other public venues around town.

See the winning posters for each grade level:

Kindergarten:

Kindergarten 1st Prize Winner

First Prize: Daphne A. (West Irondequoit)

Honorable Mentions: Jacob T. (West Irondequoit), Hazel T., Natalie M., and Mallory A. (West Irondequoit)

First Grade:

1st Grade First Prize Winner

First Prize: Moses B. (East Rochester)

Honorable Mention: Emma L. (Gates-Chili)

Second/Third Grade:

2nd/3rd Grade First Prize: Alyssa B. (Churchville-Chili)

Honorable Mentions: Fiona G. (East Rochester), Ezekiel S. (Churchville-Chili)

Fourth Grade:

4th Grade First Prize Winner

4th Grade First Prize: Giuliana C. (Rochester RC Diocese Schools)

Honorable Mention: Alissandra R. (Rochester RC Diocese Schools)

Fifth Grade:

5th Grade First Prize Winner

5th Grade First Prize: Anna B. (Churchville Chili)

Honorable Mentions: Wyatt S. (St. Rochester RC Diocese Schools), Abby F. (Honeoye Falls)

Winners of the Teacher Drawing for $500 Staples Gift Cards:

Ms. Tabor, Rochester RC Diocese Schools

Ms. Nassimos, West Irondequoit

Ms. Martin, East Rochester

Ms. Foehner, Churchville-Chili

Mrs. Selvaggio, Churchville-Chili

Ms. Coccia, East Rochester

Miss Hanss, St. Kateri

Mrs. Barton, Churchville-Chili

Ms. Kagel, Churchville-Chili

Ms. Gonzalez, (home school)

Clocks Change March 14: And Yes, You Should Still Test Your Alarms

Change your clocks, test your alarms, practice your home fire drill

Even for smoke alarms that have long-life batteries—or are hard-wired—it’s still important to make sure the alarm is working. Not every single long-life battery will work for 10 years, and even hard-wired alarms can fail. So yes, you should still test your smoke alarms at least twice a year — the Daylight Saving Time change is a good reminder—and once a month is better, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association.

Our “Test Your Alarms” message includes your CO detector. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends pushing the test button on your CO detector (which tests whether the circuitry is operating correctly), to replace the detector at the age recommended by the manufacturer, and most importantly to go outside to fresh air immediately if it goes off.

That goes for smoke alarms too: When the alarms go off, you get out. Searching for the source of the CO or the fire could be a fatal mistake.

Why practice a home fire drill? Because even the best alarm can only protect your family if everyone knows what to do when it goes off. And if that happens at night when people are sleeping—the time when most fatal fires occur—it can be harder than you think to get up and out quickly.

Make sure hallways are kept clear of clutter and that everyone knows at least two ways of getting out—one of them may be a window—especially from bedrooms. Make sure everyone understands how important it is to go to your outside meeting place, so if there is a fire you’ll know whether everyone is out. When the fire service arrives, tell them if everyone is at the meeting place and about any pets that may still be inside.

You can learn more about installing and testing smoke alarms, and planning and practice your escape, at homefiredrill.org.

Space Heater Safety

We’re spending more time at home, and that means we’re spending more time with space heaters. For homes in regions with milder winters with no central heating, space heaters may be the main source for heating. In colder climates they may be used to supplement central heating, and to keep down heating fuel costs.

Stay safe this winter with these tips:

  • Keep the heater at least 3 feet away from anything that can burn—paper, bedding, clothing, curtains or furniture  Having combustibles too close to the heat source is the leading factor contributing to home heating fires.
  • Turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Keep children away from space heaters, especially when they’re wearing night gowns or other loose clothing that can easily catch fire.
  • With electrical heaters, make sure the circuit isn’t overloaded. Plug space heaters directly into a wall outlet, and don’t plug any other electrical devices into the same outlet as the heater. Don’t use an extension cord or power strip; these could overheat and start a fire.
  • Place space heaters on level, flat surfaces.
  • Never place heaters on cabinets, tables, furniture, or carpet, which can overheat and start a fire.
  • Keep electrical heaters well away from water.
  • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.

Learn about safely using kerosene heaters here.