Yes, Light Up the Darkness—Just Do It Safely

In December, the darkest month, holiday lights and candles have always been hugely popular. This year, we’re even more inclined to light the darkness. As early as September, stores were already reporting strong sales of holiday lights and decorations. It’s only expected to increase, as we retreat into our homes during the coronavirus surge in the winter months.

Decorating our homes with light can bring great comfort. Just make sure to do it safely:

  • Consider flameless battery-operated candles, which are becoming very widely available, give a realistic glow, and can last longer than flaming candles.
  • If you use traditional candles, keep them at least 12 inches away from anything that might burn—that includes furniture, bedding, curtains and decorations. Put them out before everyone leaves the room.
  • Always unplug tree and holiday lights before leaving home or going to bed.
  • Avoid overloading outlets. Flickering lights, tripped circuit breakers, and blown fuses are warning signs. Don’t ignore them – unplug!

Find more simple steps to holiday candle and light safety here.

Time to Change Your Clock and Check Your Alarms

People often debate the value of Daylight Saving Time. But there’s no debating the value of using this biannual change as a reminder to check your smoke alarm and CO detectors.

Even for smoke alarms that have long-life batteries—or are hard-wired—it’s still important to make sure the alarm is working. Not every single long-life battery will work for 10 years, and even hard-wired alarms can fail. So yes, you should still test your smoke alarms at least twice a year — once a month is better, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association. Replace smoke alarms after 10 years.  

This is also a good time to check your CO detectors. Press and hold the Test Button on the front of the alarm until the alarm sounds (it may take up to 20 seconds). And look on the back, or near the battery compartment, for the date of manufacture. Most have a lifespan of no more than 7 years. Once you know your alarms are working, make sure everyone in your home knows what to do when the alarm goes off. Getting out may be more complicated than you think, especially if there are young children or people with disabilities in your home. And anyone may find it hard to respond quickly if the alarm goes off in the middle of the night. Go to homefiredrill.org to learn how to plan and practice a home fire drill.

Golf Tournament Raises $43,000+ to Prevent Injuries

The 2020 Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament raised more than $43,000 to benefit Prevention 1st and help us prevent injuries all year long.

Ninety golfers turned out on a beautiful September day at Irondequoit Country Club. Congratulations to our winning golfers:

Overall men’s winners: Eric Koehler, Ryan Wegman, Zach Buschner, and Joel Chiarenza.

Overall mixed winners:  Sharon Stiller, Duwaine Bascoe, Maureen Bass, and Anthony Giordano.

Many thanks to our hard-working 2020 Golf Committee: Co-chairs Jessica Holly and Michael Chatwin; Harvey Bunis; Jack Dinaburg; Eric Koehler; Stewart Moscov; Sarabeth Rogoff; and Scott Rogoff.

Tournament Sponsors

Abrams Fensterman, LLP

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Ralph Honda

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC          

Flag Sponsors

Barclay Damon, LLP

Brown & Brown of New York, Inc.

Buckingham Properties, LLC

Harvey Bunis

Community Health Strategies

Cooley Group, Inc.

Cathy & Jack Dinaburg

Rick Glazer and Family

Golisano Children’s Hospital

Sage Rutty & Co., Inc.

Sharon Stiller

Tee Sponsors

Bell Cornerstone

Canandaigua National Bank & Trust

Robert Cole & Daryl Sharp

Ernstrom & Dreste LLP

Flaherty Salmin CPAs

Graham Construction

Heritage Financial Services, LLC

Key Bank

Mengel Metzger Barr & Co.

Debbie & David Pelusio

Perlo’s Restaurant

Ralph Honda

Senator Joe Robach

Rochester Area Community Foundation, Developmental Disabilities Giving Circle

Rochester Fire Department, Fire Safety Division

Rochester Hardwood Floor

Bret & Heather Rogoff

Sage Rutty and Co., Inc.

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC

Three Ladies and Kevin

Webster Schubel & Meier, LLP

Time to Focus on Kitchen Fire Safety

October 4 – 10 is Fire Prevention Week, and this year the National Fire Protection Association is focusing on fire safety in the kitchen. No wonder: Nearly half of reported U.S. home fires start in the kitchen, and cooking is the leading cause of home fire injuries.

Check these resources to keep yourself and your family safe:

Cooking Safely at Home

Kids in the Kitchen

Cooking Matters: Be Fire Safe in the Kitchen

Cooking Matters: Modeling Kitchen Fire Safety

Protect Your Family From Scalds and Burns

Protege a su Familia de Escaldaduras (Calentamiento) y Quemaduras

Safer Cooking: Frying

For teachers, Prevention 1st also offers these lesson plans for teaching fire safety to teens with developmental disabilities, including a module on kitchen safety.

Be Safe When Choosing Hand Sanitizers

Hand sanitizer has become a staple on our shopping lists. But some of the supply being produced to meet the demand is either not effective or downright dangerous, according to the Food & Drug Administration.

The FDA’s list of over 100 hand sanitizers to be avoided includes products with inadequate levels of alcohol, as well as those containing potentially dangerous methanol.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that, when soap and water are not available, alcohol-based hand sanitizers with at least 60 percent ethanol should be used. The FDA. has found at least 4 hand sanitizers with inadequate concentrations of ethanol, including: NeoNatural, Medicare Alcohol Antiseptic Topical Solution, Datsen Hand Sanitizer and Alcohol Antiseptic 62 Percent Hand Sanitizer.

The FDA has also reported a sharp increase in hand sanitizer products that have tested positive for methanol contamination. Methanol, or wood alcohol, can be toxic when absorbed through the skin and can be life-threatening if ingested. Don’t expect methanol to be listed on the ingredients: Check the list of hand sanitizers to be avoided.

Register Now for the Sept. 21 Golf Tournament!

The 2020 Jane and Larry Glazer Memorial Golf Tournament to benefit Prevention 1st will be held on Monday, September 21. This year’s new location is Irondequoit Country Club, 4045 East Avenue, Rochester, NY.

Sponsorships are available, and non-golfers are welcome for dinner following the tournament.

Download the flyer and registration form here.

The event will adhere to all necessary safety guidelines, including table spacing and seating capacity. Golfers may ride two to a cart, however if a golfer wishes to maintain space they may walk and keep their clubs on the cart.

Please contact one of the following with questions:
Jessica Holly (co-chair): jbdinaburg@gmail.com
Michael Chatwin (co-chair): mchatwin@logs.com
Jack Dinaburg, (585) 766-3660

Thank you to our Sponsors!

Buckingham Properties

Sage Rutty

Abrams Fensterman

Ralph Honda

Shapiro, DiCaro & Barack, LLC

8-Year-Olds’ Summer Camp for Younger Kids Raises Funds for Prevention 1st

Camp;bell Rogoff with her friend and co-counselor Lily Rae.
Campbell Rogoff (right) with her co-counselor Lily Rae

Eight-year-old Campbell Rogoff got the idea while playing with a 5-year-old neighbor in the Rogoff’s pool:  “We could call this Camp Campbell”. She talked with her friend Lily Rae, also 8, about making Camp Campbell official.

“We thought it would be great that kids can get out, and be with other kids,” said Campbell. Their day camp would have a variety of activities and charge a reasonable camp fee.

Lily Rae suggested a business model: they needed a ‘trial’ day to see if the idea would fly. When four kids came on the trial day and “everyone loved it,” the girls knew they had a winning model. When Camp Campbell officially opened on a Wednesday, they had nine campers ages 4-6 years old. By the second camp day on Friday, nine new and returning campers showed up.

Campbell’s parents knew just how successful their daughter’s idea was when they got a call from someone they didn’t even know. 

“A mother had heard ‘Camp Campbell’ was open and wanted to know how to enroll her child!” recalls Campbell’s father Brett.

“Miss Campbell” and “Miss Lily Rae,” as their nametags identified them, provided lots of activities besides swimming in the pool. The campers enjoyed making and playing with water balloons, ‘slime,’ and bubble mix, as well as—the favorite—whacking a pinata. Along with the fun they were also taught important pool safety rules, such as staying in the shallow end of a pool if you haven’t yet learned to swim.

Camp Campbell raised $100 in camp fees. Campbell discussed it with her family and decided to donate the money to Prevention 1st, of which Brett Rogoff is a Board member. The Rogoffs have added their own donation to this, introducing the girls to another model: the matching gift.

It may be possible to be too successful. One mom reported her son had begged: “Let’s go to Camp Campbell every day!”

Every day might be a bit too much work. But Campbell and Lily Rae do plan to bring back Camp Campbell later this summer. After all, the demand is there. And they’ve got a winning model.

When Fire Moves Outside

A campfire casts a warm glow and a sense of adventure—even if it’s in your own backyard. Cooking dinner outside on a grill can make any meal “our favorite!” This year, being outside is a special pleasure. As we move outdoors and bring fire with us, it’s important to bring safety as well.

  • Pick your spot carefully. Whether it’s a grill or firepit, make sure it’s well away from houses and sheds, vehicles, shrubs and trees including low-hanging branches.
  • Enforce a “3-Foot Rule” just as you do for the stove. Keep children and pets at least three feet from the fire or grill.
  • Never use gasoline or kerosene on either a grill or a campfire.  If you’re using starter fluid with your grill, never put the fluid on a hot grill. Make sure lighter fluids are stored securely and away from children.
  • Resist the belief that bigger is better when it comes to campfires! A roaring blaze can more easily get out of control, and can send embers long distances.
  • Just as you wouldn’t leave the stove unattended, never leave your campfire or grill unattended. Put a campfire out completely before you go to bed. When you’re done with a charcoal grill, let the coals cool completely before moving or storing it.
  • Store lighters and matches out of sight and reach of children.
  • Model safe behavior for your children, treating fire with respect. Avoid assigning fire tasks to children too young to understand fire risk or react if something unexpected happens. To learn more about what children understand about fire.

Stay Safe When Disinfecting Your Home

Cleaning and disinfecting our homes has taken on new importance during the coronavirus pandemic. To stay safe, it’s equally important to use and store cleaning and disinfecting products properly. The CDC has these tips:

  • Keep cleaning products out of reach in homes with small children and pets.
  • Never mix chlorine bleach with ammonia–or any chemical other than water. This can create deadly gasses. (Note: Bleach can appear on ingredients lists as sodium hypochlorite).
  • Just as you shouldn’t directly mix chemicals in a bottle, be careful about using one product after another on the same surface. If you must use two separate products to clean and disinfect, wipe the surface thoroughly with water to remove all residue from the first product before using the second.
  • When using bleach keep the area well-ventilated.
  • Disinfectant sprays are meant to be used on surfaces, never on the body, pets, or food.

The CDC provides these directions for a proper bleach solution: 5 tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water, OR 4 teaspoons of bleach per quart of water. Make only as much bleach solution as you’ll need right now, because it starts to lose effectiveness after only about a day.